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Nicola Salvi
 
 
Nicola Salvi, Nicola also spelled Niccolò (born Aug. 6, 1697, Rome [Italy]—died Feb. 8, 1751, Rome), Italian sculptor and architect whose late Roman Baroque masterpiece is the Trevi Fountain in Rome.

After studying painting and architecture, Salvi competed unsuccessfully in 1732 for the commission to make the facade of San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome, but in the same year his project for the Trevi Fountain was chosen in preference to those of many competitors. Most of his energy was absorbed by the work; he was responsible not only for the overall design but also for the details of the decoration and the program of the statuary. After Salvi’s death, Giuseppe Pannini finished the fountain in 1762, somewhat altering the original scheme. The idea of combining palace front and fountain was derived from a project by Pietro da Cortona, but the grand pageantry of the fountain’s central triumphal arch with its mythological and allegorical figures, natural rock formations, and gushing water was Salvi’s. Salvi also executed minor works in churches and, with Luigi Vanvitelli, enlarged Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s Odescalchi Palace.

Encyclopædia Britannica
 
 
Trevi Fountain
 
Trevi Fountain (Italian: Fontana di Trevi) is a fountain in the Trevi district in Rome, Italy, designed by Italian architect Nicola Salvi and completed by Pietro Bracci. Standing 26.3 metres (86 ft) high and 49.15 metres (161.3 ft) wide, it is the largest Baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world. The fountain has appeared in several notable films, including Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita and is a popular tourist attraction.
 
History before 1629

The fountain at the junction of three roads (tre vie) marks the terminal point of the "modern" Acqua Vergine, the revived Aqua Virgo, one of the aqueducts that supplied water to ancient Rome. In 19 BC, supposedly with the help of a virgin, Roman technicians located a source of pure water some 13 km (8.1 mi) from the city. (This scene is presented on the present fountain's façade.) However, the eventual indirect route of the aqueduct made its length some 22 km (14 mi). This Aqua Virgo led the water into the Baths of Agrippa. It served Rome for more than 400 years. The coup de grâce for the urban life of late classical Rome came when the Goth besiegers in 537/38 cut off the aqueducts. Medieval Romans were reduced to drawing water from polluted wells and the Tiber River.

Legends

Legend holds that in 19 BC thirsty Roman soldiers were guided by a young girl to a source of pure water thirteen kilometers from the city of Rome. The discovery of the source led Augustus to commission the construction of a twenty-two kilometer aqueduct leading into the city, which was named Aqua Virgo, or Virgin Waters, in honor of the legendary young girl. The aqueduct served the hot Baths of Agrippa, and Rome, for over four hundred years.

Commission, construction, and design

In 1629 Pope Urban VIII, finding the earlier fountain insufficiently dramatic, asked Gian Lorenzo Bernini to sketch possible renovations, but the project was abandoned when the pope died. Though Bernini's project was never constructed, there are many Bernini touches in the fountain as it exists today. An early, influential model by Pietro da Cortona, preserved in the Albertina, Vienna, also exists, as do various early 18th century sketches, most unsigned, as well as a project attributed to Nicola Michetti one attributed to Ferdinando Fuga and a French design by Edme Bouchardon.

Competitions had become the rage during the Baroque era to design buildings, fountains and even the Spanish Steps. In 1730 Pope Clement XII organized a contest in which Nicola Salvi initially lost to Alessandro Galilei – but due to the outcry in Rome over the fact that a Florentine won, Salvi was awarded the commission anyway. Work began in 1732 and the fountain was completed in 1762, long after Salvi's death, when Pietro Bracci's Oceanus (god of all water) was set in the central niche.
Salvi died in 1751 with his work half finished, but he had made sure a stubborn barber's unsightly sign would not spoil the ensemble, hiding it behind a sculpted vase, called by Romans the asso di coppe, the "Ace of Cups".
The Trevi Fountain was finished in 1762 by Giuseppe Pannini, who substituted the present allegories for planned sculptures of Agrippa and "Trivia", the Roman virgin. It remains one of the most historical cultural landmarks in Rome.

 
 
 
Trevi Fountain in Rome, Italy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

La celebre scena del film La Dolce Vita con Marcello Mastroianni e Anita Ekberg nella Fontana

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
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