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  Jacques Lemercier  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Jacques Lemercier
 
 
 
 
Jacques Lemercier, Lemercier also spelled Le Mercier (born 1585, Pontoise, France—died June 4, 1654, Paris), French architect who, along with François Mansart and Louis Le Vau, shaped French architecture by introducing classical elements.

Lemercier belonged to a famous family of builders. For several years between 1607 and 1614 he was in Rome, where he probably studied with Rosato Rosati, whose Church of San Carlo ai Catinari was Lemercier’s model for the Church of the Sorbonne, in Paris.

Following his completion of the Church of l’Oratoire (1616; begun by C. Métezeau), Lemercier became recognized as the new master of classicism in France. He was commissioned by Louis XIII to carry out the enlargement of the old Louvre courtyard (now the Cour Carrée), planned by Pierre Lescot, and to this purpose he built the Pavillon de l’Horloge and the adjoining wings to the north. The rich ornament and complex proportions of the Pavillon de l’Horloge make it one of his most successful buildings.

Cardinal Richelieu soon became his patron, and Lemercier built for him the Palais-Cardinal, subsequently renamed the Palais Royal, in Paris (1629). The theatre of the Palais was one of the first structures in France built exclusively for theatrical use. It was also for Richelieu that Lemercier built the Church of the Sorbonne (begun 1626), perhaps the earliest French building to have a dome set on a high drum. The most ambitious project carried out for his patron was the design of a château and surrounding town at Richelieu in Indre-et-Loire (begun 1631). Although the château was largely demolished in the early 19th century, the town survives.

In 1646 Lemercier took over the completion of François Mansart’s Church of the Val-de-Grâce in Paris; however, he is now believed not to have been responsible for finishing the church because very little construction was done between 1646 and his death. Lemercier died just after beginning Saint-Roch (1653), which became the principal Parisian church of the early 18th century.

Encyclopædia Britannica
 
 
 
The Pavillon de l’Horloge (French, "Clock Pavilion") is a prominent element of the Palais du Louvre in Paris. It was built between 1624 and 1654 under King Louis XIV. The famous structure, with its distinctive domed roof, was designed by architect Jacques Lemercier (1585–1654). It is adjacent to the famous Lescot Wing. Its older name comes from a clock later incorporated into its elevation. More recently, it has also become known as Pavillon Sully (after Maximilien de Béthune, duc de Sully).
 
 

Western facade of Pavillon Sully (Pavillon de l’Horloge)
 
 
 
 

Pavillon de l’Horloge (detail)
 
 
 

The chapel at the Sorbonne, 1635: prototype for Mansart's at Les Invalides.
 
 
 
The Palais-Royal (French pronunciation: ​[pa.lɛ ʁwa.jal]), originally called the Palais-Cardinal, is a palace located in the 1st arrondissement of Paris. The screened entrance court faces the Place du Palais-Royal, opposite the Louvre. The larger inner courtyard, the Cour d'Honneur, has since 1986 contained Daniel Buren's site-specific art piece Les Deux Plateaux, known as Les Colonnes de Buren. In 1830 the Cour d'Honneur was enclosed to the north by what was probably the most famous of Paris's covered arcades, the Galerie d'Orléans. Demolished in the 1930s, its flanking rows of columns still stand between the Cour d'Honneur and the popular Palais-Royal Gardens.
 
Originally called the Palais-Cardinal, the palace was the personal residence of Cardinal Richelieu. The architect Jacques Lemercier began his design in 1629; construction commenced in 1633 and was completed in 1639. Upon Richelieu's death in 1642 the palace became the property of the King and acquired the new name Palais-Royal.
After Louis XIII died the following year, it became the home of the Queen Mother Anne of Austria and her young sons Louis XIV and Philippe, duc d'Anjou, along with her advisor Cardinal Mazarin.
From 1649, the palace was the residence of the exiled Henrietta Maria and Henrietta Anne Stuart, wife and daughter of the deposed King Charles I of England. The two had escaped England in the midst of the English Civil War and were sheltered by Henrietta Maria's nephew, King Louis XIV.
 

Entrance front of the Palais-Royal on the rue Saint-Honoré
 
 
 

Eglise Saint Pierre Saint Paul - Rueil-Malmaison - façade
 
 
 

 
 
 
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