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  History of photography

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History of photography
 
 
 
Jacques Henri Lartigue
 

Jacques Henri Lartigue (June 13, 1894 - September 12, 1986) was a French photographer and painter.
Born in Courbevoie (a city outside of Paris) to a wealthy family, he is most famous for his stunning photos of automobile races, planes and fashionable Parisian women from the turn of the century.
He started taking photos when he was 6, his subject matter being primarily his own life and the people and activities in it. As a child he photographed his friends and family at play – running and jumping, racing wheeled soap boxes, building kites, gliders and aeroplanes, climbing the Eiffel Tower and so on. He also photographed many famous sporting events, including automobile races such as the Coupe Gordon Bennett and the French Grand Prix, early flights by aviation pioneers including Gabriel Voisin, Louis Blériot, and Roland Garros, and tennis players such as Suzanne Lenglen at the French Open tennis championships.
Although little seen in that format, many of his earliest and most famous photographs were originally taken in stereo, but he also produced vast numbers of images in all formats and media including glass plates in various sizes, some of the earliest autochromes, and of course film in 2 1/4” square and 35mm. His greatest achievement was his set of around 120 huge photograph albums, which compose the finest visual autobiography ever produced. While he sold a few photographs in his youth, mainly to sporting magazines such as La Vie au Grand Air, in middle age he concentrated on his painting, and it was through this that he earned his living, although he maintained written and photographic journals throughout his life. Only when he was 69 were his boyhood photographs serendipitously discovered by Charles Rado of the Rapho agency, who introduced him to John Szarkowski, then curator of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, who in turn arranged an exhibition of his work at the museum.
From this, there was a photo spread in Life magazine in 1963, coincidentally in the issue which commemorated the death of John Kennedy, ensuring the widest possible audience for his pictures.
By then as he received stints for fashion magazines, he was famous in other countries other than his native France, when until 1974 he was commissioned by the newly elected President of France Valery Giscard d'Estaing to shoot an official portrait photograph. The result was a simple photo of him without the use of lighting utilising the national flag as a background. He was rewarded with his first French retrospective at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs at the following year and had more commissions from fashion and decoration magazines flooding in for the rest of his life.
His first book, Diary of a Century was published soon afterwards in collaboration with Richard Avedon, and from then on innumerable books and exhibitions throughout the world have featured Lartigue's photographs. He continued taking photographs throughout the last three decades of his life, finally achieving the commercial success that had previously evaded this rather unworldly man.
Although best known as a photographer, Lartigue was a capable if not especially gifted painter and showed in the official salons in Paris and in the south of France from 1922 on. He was friends with a wide selection of literary and artistic celebrities including the playwright Sacha Guitry, the singer Yvonne Printemps, the painters Kees van Dongen, Pablo Picasso and the artist-playwright-filmmaker Jean Cocteau. He also worked on the sets of the film-makers Jacques Feyder, Abel Gance, Robert Bresson, François Truffaut and Federico Fellini, and many of these celebrities became the subject of his photographs. Lartigue, however, photographed everyone he came in contact with, his most frequent muses being his three wives, and his mistress of the early 1930s, the Romanian model Renée Perle.

 
 
 


My Hydroglider with Propeller
1904


The ZYX 24 takes off, Rouzat
1910


Avenue du Bois de Boulogne, Paris
1911


Zissou, Rouzat
1911


Car Trip, Papa at 80 kilometers an hour
1913


Fuborg
1929


In My Room, Paris
1905


Rene, Biarritz
1930


Villerville, Ma Cousine Simone
1904


Levent de l'helice de l'aeroplane Ensault Pelterie
1911


Bois de Boulogne Monsieur Folletete Le Secretaire de Papa avec son chien Tupy, Paris
1912


Still Life with Disembodied Hands, Fruit, and Vase
circa 1930


Oleo, Rouzat
1908


Florette
1944


Simone Roussel – Solo
1913


Megeve, January
1930


Toby, Royan, August 1923
Image courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York


Bibi, Etretat
1920


Solange, Neuilly
1929


Drag-racing Day at the Auteuil races, Paris, June 23
1911


Renee - Paris to Aix-les-Bains
1931


Chou Valton, Plage de la Garoupe, 1932


Dani, Renee and Jacques-Henri Lartigue


Zissou, La Baule, August 1929


Dancers


Maud Lallemand, Bandol, June 1933


Florette, Monte Carlo Beach, August


Florette, Monte Carlo Beach, August


Maud Lallemand, Bandol, June 1933


Rouzat, Dé Dé, Lartigue's cousin, diving with water wing, 1911


Rouzat, riding the "Bobsleigh Course", 1910


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Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932



Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932
 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932

 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932

 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932

 


Renee Perle, 1930-1932



Bibi in Nice,1920

 
 
 

 
 
 
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