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Henry Holland
 
 

Henry Holland
 
 
Henry Holland, (born July 20, 1745—died June 17, 1806, London, Eng.), English architect whose elegant, simple Neoclassicism contrasted with the more lavish Neoclassical style of his great contemporary Robert Adam.
 
Beginning as an assistant to his father, a successful builder, Holland later became the partner and son-in-law of the landscape architect Lancelot (“Capability”) Brown. Among his works in London were Brooks’s Club (1776–78).

In 1783 the prince of Wales (the future George III) joined the club and subsequently hired Holland to remodel Carlton House (from 1783; demolished 1826), the prince’s town residence. The prince encouraged Holland’s interest in French architecture and decoration, and Holland began to use French craftsmen on his projects. Work for the prince led to further aristocratic commissions for Holland.

At Brighton, Sussex, Holland built the Marine Pavilion (1786–87), an addition to an existing villa owned by the prince, connecting the two sections with a rotunda having a low dome and two wings of two stories each.

This building, now called the Royal Pavilion, was rendered unrecognizable by William Porden’s addition (1804–08) and John Nash’s remodeling (1815–c. 1822), both in what was an Orientalist style derived from Islamic architecture in India.

Another of Holland’s relatively few projects was the remodeling of the Theatre Royal, also known as the Drury Lane Theatre (1791–94; burned 1809), commissioned by the dramatist and impresario Richard Brinsley Sheridan.

Encyclopædia Britannica

 
 
 

Benham Park, Berkshire 1774-75
 
 
 

Trentham Hall, 1775-78, demolished
 
 
 

Cardiff Castle (Holland's work is the pale coloured stone)
 
 
 

Berrington Hall
 
 
 

Carlton House
 
 
 

Carlton House, Portico
 
 
 

Garden front, Carlton House
 
 
 

Brighton Marine Pavilion (Royal Pavilion Brighton) as designed by Holland c.1788
 
 
 

Entrance front, Althorp House
 
 
 

The Exterior, Theatre Royal Drury Lane, burnt down 1809
 
 
 

Entrance front, Dover House, Whitehall
 
 
 

East India House, City of London, demolished
 
 
 

 
 
 
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