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  James Gillray  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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James Gillray
 
 
 
 
James Gillray, (born Aug. 13, 1756, Chelsea, near London, Eng.—died June 1, 1815, London), English caricaturist chiefly remembered for lively political cartoons directed against George III of England and Napoleon I. Often scurrilous and violent in his criticism, he brought a highly dramatic sense of situation and analogy to cartooning.

Gillray learned letter engraving and in 1778 was admitted as a student to the Royal Academy. The first caricature that is certainly his is “Paddy on Horseback,” published in 1779. The name of Gillray’s publisher and printseller, Miss Hanna Humphrey, is inextricably associated with his; he lived in her house during all the years of his fame, and his prints were shown in the windows of her shop.

Gillray’s caricatures may be divided into two classes: political and social. The political caricatures form a historical record of the latter part of the reign of George III, whom Gillray called “Farmer George.” They were widely circulated throughout Britain and Europe. In this series George III, the Queen, the Prince of Wales, Charles James Fox, Edmund Burke, William Pitt, and Napoleon are trenchantly satirized; the latter two are featured in a celebrated cartoon, “The Plum Pudding in Danger.” Among Gillray’s best satires on the king are “The Anti-Saccharites,” in which the king and queen propose to dispense with sugar to the great horror of the family, and the companion plates of Farmer George and his wife “Frying Sprats” and “Toasting Muffins.” After 1807 Gillray declined mentally and eventually became insane.

Gillray’s plates were executed in etching with stipple and coloured by hand. They were produced in broadsheets for popular consumption, and perhaps this is one of the reasons for the spontaneity that makes them so lively and timely.

Encyclopædia Britannica

 
 

Very Slippy-Weather (1808)





L'Assemblée Nationale (1804) was called "the most talented caricature that has ever appeared", partly due to its "admirable likenesses". The Prince of Wales paid a large sum of money to have it suppressed and its plate destroyed.





The reception of the Diplomatique (Macartney) and his suite, at the Court of Pekin. Published in September 1792.





Monstrous Craws, at a New Coalition Feast (1787)





A Voluptuary under the horrors of Digestion (1792)




Temperance Enjoying a Frugal Meal (1792)





The world being carved up into spheres of influence between Pitt and Napoleon - "probably the most famous political cartoon of all time -it has been stolen over and over and over again by cartoonists ever since." [3]





The Cow-Pock—or—the Wonderful Effects of the New Inoculation! (1802)





Doublûres of Characters;—or—striking Resemblances in Phisiognomy.—"If you would know Mens Hearts, look in their Faces." (1798)




The loss of the faro bank; or - the rook's pigeon'd (1797)






The Gout (1799)

 
 
 
 


Light expelling Darkness,—Evaporation of Stygian Exhalations,—or—The Sun of the Constitution, rising superior to the Clouds of Opposition (1795)
 
 
 
 


Fashionable Contrasts;—or—The Duchess's little Shoe yeilding [sic] to the Magnitude of the Duke's Foot (1792)
 
 
 
 

THE THEATRICAL BUBBLE: BEING A NEW SPECIMEN OF ASTONISHING POWERS IN THE GREAT…
 
 
 
 

"GERMANS EATING SOUR-KROUT"
 
 
 
 

DIDO IN DESPAIR
 
 
 
 

NAPOLEON THE GINGERBREAD BAKER CREATING NEW KINGS, A COMMENT
 
 
 
 
 

NAPOLEON MAY HAVE TAMED THE RUSSIAN BEAR
 
 
 
 
 

NAPOLEON THE LITTLE CORSICAN GARDENER PLANTS WHAT HE HOPES WILL BE A NEW DYNASTY
 
 
 
 
 

POLITICAL DREAMINGS, VISIONS OF PEACE, PROSPECTIVE HORRORS
 
 
 
 

METALLIC-TRACTORS, SATIRICAL ETCHING
 
 
 

 
 
 
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