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  Giacomo Balla  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Giacomo Balla
 
 
 
 
Giacomo Balla, (born July 24, 1871, Turin, Italy—died March 1, 1958, Rome), Italian artist and founding member of the Futurist movement in painting.

Balla had little formal art training, having attended briefly an academy in Turin. He moved to Rome in his twenties. As a young artist, he was greatly influenced by French Neo-Impressionism during a sojourn he made in Paris in 1900. Upon his return to Rome, he adopted the Neo-Impressionist style and imparted it to two younger artists, Umberto Boccioni and Gino Severini. Balla’s early works reflect contemporary French trends but also hint at his lifelong interest in rendering light and its effects. Balla, Boccioni, and Severini gradually came under the influence of the Milanese poet Filippo Marinetti, who in 1909 launched the literary movement he called Futurism, which was an attempt to revitalize Italian culture by embracing the power of modern science and technology. In 1910 Balla and other Italian artists published the Technical Manifesto of Futurist Painting.

Unlike most Futurists, Balla was a lyrical painter, unconcerned with modern machines or violence. The Street Light—Study of Light (1909), for example, is a dynamic depiction of light. Despite his unique taste in subject matter, in works such as this Balla conveys a sense of speed and urgency that puts his paintings in line with Futurism’s fascination with the energy of modern life. One of his best-known works, Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash (1912), shows an almost frame-by-frame view of a woman walking a dog on a boulevard. The work illustrates his principle of simultaneity—i.e., the rendering of motion by simultaneously showing many aspects of a moving object. This interest in capturing a single moment in a series of planes was derived from Cubism, but it was also no doubt tied to Balla’s interest in the technology of photography.

During World War I Balla composed a series of paintings in which he attempted to convey the impression of movement or velocity through the use of planes of colour; these works are perhaps the most abstract of all Futurist paintings. After the war he remained faithful to the Futurist style long after its other practitioners had abandoned it. In addition to his painting, during these years he explored stage design, graphic design, and even acting. At the end of his career he abandoned his lifelong pursuit of near abstraction and reverted to a more traditional style.

Encyclopædia Britannica

 
 
 

Self-portrait





Young Girl Running on a Balcony
1912


Form-Spirit Transformation
1918




B&W Futurist forcefield



Swifts: Paths of movement + Dynamic Sequences



Futur
1923





Velocidad de automovil





B&W Synthesis of movement



Manifestacion patriotica






Dinamismo de perro con correa



Street Light






Transformacion forma-espiritu



Scienza contra obscurantismo


 


Feu d'artifice

 
 
 



B&W Primavera






Futur


 


Violín y paleta



Landscape
1913


Velocidad abstracta + Sonido



Futur streamlines v2






Pessimismo e optimismo





Vortex, space, form





Line of speed + form + noise





Warship, widow and wind





Mercury passing in front of sun





The spell is broken





Landscape





Abstract Speed - The Car has Passed






Feu d'artifice

 
 
 
 

Plastic ensemble

 
 
 
 


B&W Sculpture Dynamic of Boccioni's fist
 
 
 

 
 
 
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