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  Washington Allston  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Washington Allston
 
 

Washington Allston. Self-portrait
 
 
Washington Allston, (born Nov. 5, 1779, Allston plantation, Brook Green Domain on Waccamaw River, S.C., U.S.—died July 9, 1843, Cambridgeport, Mass.), painter and author, commonly held to be the first important American Romantic painter. Allston is known for his experiments with dramatic subject matter and his use of light and atmospheric colour. Although his production was small, it shaped future American landscape painting by its dramatic portrayals of mood. Allston’s work anticipated that of a line of American visionary painters including Albert Pinkham Ryder and Ralph Blakelock.

Allston graduated from Harvard University in 1800. He studied in London at the Royal Academy and visited the great museums of Paris (1803–04) and Italy (1804–08). During this period he became friendly with the writers Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Washington Irving. Allston spent the years from 1808 to 1811 in Boston. He then spent seven productive years in London and returned to Boston in 1818, finally settling in Cambridgeport, Mass., in 1830.

Before his final return to the United States, Allston’s art was dramatic and large in scale. He delighted in the supernatural; this taste is evident, for example, in “Belshazzar’s Feast” (1817–43). His dramatic landscapes “The Deluge” (1804) and “Elijah in the Desert” (1818) are among the first important achievements of American landscape painting.

After his return to Boston in 1818 Allston’s art became quieter, striking a new note of reverie and fantasy. “Moonlit Landscape” (1819) and “The Flight of Florimel” (1819) are the chief works of the period before he became preoccupied with “Belshazzar’s Feast,” which he had brought unfinished from London. He worked on this from 1820 to 1828 and from 1839 until his death.

Allston was also a writer; his poems, The Sylphs of the Seasons with Other Poems (1813), and a Gothic novel, Monaldi (1841), were popular in his day. His theory of art was posthumously published as Lectures on Art, and Poems (1850).

Encyclopædia Britannica

 
 
 
 


Belshazzar's Feast





Uriel Standing in the Sun




Moonlit Landscape, 1809






The Flight of Florimell





Mrs. William Channing


 



Coast Scene on the Mediterranean, 1811






Dr. John King







Hermia and Helena





Portrait of Samuel Taylor Coleridge







Elijah in the Desert







Landscape With A Lake







The Spanish Girl in Reverie





Storm Rising at Sea, 1804


 



Benjamin West






Christ Healing the Sick







Italian Landscape







Italian Shepherd Boy







Italian Shepherd Boy








Jacob's Dream







Miriam the Prophetess







Romantic Landscape







Samuel Taylor Coleridge







The Dead Man Restored to Life by Touching the Bones of the Prophet Elisha







Donna Mencia







Saul and the Witch of Endor







Beatrice







Portrait of American theologian William Ellery Channing







Jeremiah Dictating His Prophecy of the Destruction of Jerusalem to Baruch the Scribe







The Sisters Creator







Italian Landscape








Mother Watching Her Child








Scene from Shakespeare's "The Taming of the Shrew" (Katharina and Petruchio)

 
 
 

 
 
 
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