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Hubert Parry
 
 
 
 
Sir Hubert Hastings Parry, Baronet, original name in full Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (born Feb. 27, 1848, Bournemouth, Hampshire, Eng.—died Oct. 7, 1918, Rustington, Sussex), composer, writer, and teacher, influential in the revival of English music at the end of the 19th century.

While at Eton, where he studied composition, he took the bachelor of music degree from Oxford (1867). Among his later teachers, the pianist Edward Dannreuther particularly influenced him.

Parry’s Scenes from Prometheus Unbound (1880) was the first of a series of choral works that showed his gift for the massive effects that characterized English music of the rest of the 19th century. Among his works are Blest Pair of Sirens (1887) for chorus and orchestra; the oratorios Judith (1888), Job (1892), and King Saul (1894); and his Songs of Farewell (1916–18). His unison song “Jerusalem” (1916), a setting of words from William Blake’s Milton, became almost a second national anthem during and after World War I. His other works include five symphonies, Symphonic Variations, chorale preludes for organ, motets, and many songs.

In 1883 Parry was appointed choragus (festival conductor) of the University of Oxford and joined the staff of the Royal College of Music, London, becoming its director in 1894. In 1900 he became professor of music at Oxford. He was knighted in 1898 and created a baronet in 1903; he died without sons, and the baronetcy became extinct. His writings on music include Studies of Great Composers (1886), The Evolution of the Art of Music (1896), Johann Sebastian Bach (1909), and Style in Musical Art (1911).

Encyclopædia Britannica
 
 
 
 
 
Jerusalem by Hubert Parry
 
Parry's "Jerusalem" performed at the Musikfestspiele Potsdam Sanssouci by the Deutsches Filmorchester Babelsberg and Deborah Hawksley under the direction of Scott Lawton.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry: Jerusalem (Orch. Elgar)
 
Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry, 1st Baronet (27 February 1848 -- 7 October 1918) was an English composer, teacher and historian of music. Parry's first major works appeared in 1880. As a composer he is best known for the choral song "Jerusalem", the coronation anthem "I was glad", the choral and orchestral ode Blest Pair of Sirens, and the hymn tune "Repton", which sets the words "Dear Lord and Father of Mankind". His orchestral works include five symphonies and a set of Symphonic Variations. After early attempts to work in insurance, at his father's behest, Parry was taken up by George Grove, first as a contributor to Grove's massive Dictionary of Music and Musicians in the 1870s and 80s, and then in 1883 as professor of composition and musical history at the Royal College of Music, of which Grove was the first head. In 1895 Parry succeeded Grove as head of the College, remaining in the post for the rest of his life. He was concurrently professor of music at the University of Oxford from 1900 to 1908. He wrote several books about music and music history, the best-known of which is probably his 1909 study of Johann Sebastian Bach. Both in his lifetime and afterwards, Parry's reputation and critical standing have varied. His academic duties were considerable, and prevented him from devoting all his energies to composition, but some contemporaries such as Charles Villiers Stanford rated him as the finest English composer since Henry Purcell; others, such as Frederick Delius, did not. Parry's influence on later composers, by contrast, is widely recognised. Edward Elgar learned much of his craft from Parry's articles in Grove's Dictionary, and among those who studied under Parry at the Royal College were Ralph Vaughan Williams, Gustav Holst, Frank Bridge and John Ireland...

"And did those feet in ancient time" is a short poem by William Blake from the preface to his epic Milton a Poem, one of a collection of writings known as the Prophetic Books. The date of 1804 on the title page is probably when the plates were begun, but the poem was printed c. 1808. Today it is best known as the anthem "Jerusalem", with music written by Sir Hubert Parry in 1916. The poem was inspired by the apocryphal story that a young Jesus, accompanied by his uncle Joseph of Arimathea, a tin merchant, travelled to what is now England and visited Glastonbury during the unknown years of Jesus. The legend is linked to an idea in the Book of Revelation (3:12 and 21:2) describing a Second Coming, wherein Jesus establishes a new Jerusalem. The Christian Church in general, and the English Church in particular, has long used Jerusalem as a metaphor for Heaven, a place of universal love and peace. In the most common interpretation of the poem, Blake implies that a visit by Jesus would briefly create heaven in England, in contrast to the "dark Satanic Mills" of the Industrial Revolution. Blake's poem asks four questions rather than asserting the historical truth of Christ's visit. Thus the poem merely implies that there may, or may not, have been a divine visit, when there was briefly heaven in England...

Lyrics & English Translation

And did those feet in ancient time.
Walk upon Englands mountains green:
And was the holy Lamb of God,
On Englands pleasant pastures seen!

And did the Countenance Divine,
Shine forth upon our clouded hills?
And was Jerusalem builded here,
Among these dark Satanic Mills?

Bring me my Bow of burning gold;
Bring me my Arrows of desire:
Bring me my Spear: O clouds unfold!
Bring me my Chariot of fire!

I will not cease from Mental Fight,
Nor shall my Sword sleep in my hand:
Till we have built Jerusalem,
In Englands green & pleasant Land

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sir Hubert Parry - Symphony No.1 in G-major (1882)
 
Symphony No.1 in G-major (1882)

Mov.I: Con fuoco 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 12:28
Mov.III: Presto - Meno mosso 23:24
Mov.IV: Allegretto molto vivace 32:58

Orchestra: The London Philharmonic

Conductor: Matthias Bambert

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry - Symphony No.2 in F-major "The Cambridge" (1883)
 
Symphony No.2 in F-major "The Cambridge" (1883)

Mov.I: Andante sostenuto - Allegro moderato 00:00
Mov.II: Scherzo. Molto vivace - Poco più mosso - Presto 11:48
Mov.III: Andante 19:11
Mov.IV: Allegro vivace 27:21

Orchestra: The London Philharmonic

Conductor: Matthias Bambert

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry - Symphony No.3 in C-major "The English" (1889)
 
Symphony No.3 in C-major "The English" (1889)

Mov.I: Allegro energico 00:00
Mov.II: Andante sostenuto 07:50
Mov.III: Allegro molto scherzoso 17:54
Mov.IV: Moderato 23:23

Orchestra: The London Philharmonic

Conductor: Matthias Bamert

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry - Symphony No.4 in E-minor (1889)
 
Symphony No.4 in E-minor (1889)

Mov.I: Con fuoco 00:00
Mov.II: Molto Adagio 16:20
Mov.III: Allegretto 24:55
Mov.IV: Spiritoso 32:29

Orchestra: The London Philharmonic

Conductor: Matthias Bamert

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry - Symphony No.5 in B-minor (1912)
 
Symphony No.5 in B-minor (1912)

Mov.I: Stress: Slow - Allegro - Tempo I 00:00
Mov.II: Love: Lento 07:06
Mov.III: Play: Vivace 13:05
Mov.IV: Now: Moderato 17:52

Orchestra: The London Philharmonic

Conductor: Matthias Bamert

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry - Songs of Farewell (1/6)
 
Songs of Farewell (1913-16)
1. My soul there is a country
poem by Henry Vaughan (1622-1695)

Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge conducted by Richard Marlow

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry - Songs of Farewell (2/6)
 
Songs of Farewell (1913-16)
2. I know my soul hat power
poem by Sir John Davies (1569-1626)

Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge conducted by Richard Marlow

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry - Songs of Farewell (4/6)
 
Songs of Farewell (1913-16)
4. There is an old belief
poem by John Gibson Lockhart (1794-1854)

Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge conducted by Richard Marlo

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry - Songs of Farewell (5/6)
 
Songs of Farewell (1913-16)
5. At the round earth's imagined corners
poem by John Donne (1572-1631)

Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge conducted by Richard Marlow

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hubert Parry - Songs of Farewell (6/6)
 
Songs of Farewell (1913-16)
6. Lord, let me know mine end
Psalm XXXIX

Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge conducted by Richard Marlow

Parry's first major works appeared in 1880. As a composer he is best known for the choral song "Jerusalem", the coronation anthem "I was glad" and the hymn tune "Repton", which sets the words "Dear Lord and Father of Mankind". He was director of the Royal College of Music from 1895 until his death and was also professor of music at the University of Oxford from 1900 to 1908. He also wrote several books about music and music history. Some contemporaries rated him as the finest English composer since Henry Purcell, but his academic duties prevented him from devoting all his energies to composition, and some felt this prevented him from fulfilling his potential.

Influenced as a composer principally by Bach and Brahms, Parry evolved a powerful diatonic style which itself greatly influenced future English composers such as Elgar and Vaughan Williams. His own full development as a composer was almost certainly hampered by the immense amount of work he took on, but his energy and charisma, not to mention his abilities as a teacher and administrator, helped establish art music at the centre of English cultural life. As head of the Royal College of Music, his pupils included Gustav Holst, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Frank Bridge and John Ireland.

 
 
 
 
 
 
     
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