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Joseph Haydn
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn, in full Franz Joseph Haydn (born March 31, 1732, Rohrau, Austria—died May 31, 1809, Vienna), Austrian composer who was one of the most important figures in the development of the Classical style in music during the 18th century. He helped establish the forms and styles for the string quartet and the symphony.

Early years
Haydn was the second son of humble parents. His father was a wheelwright, his mother, before her marriage, a cook for the lords of the village. Haydn early revealed unusual musical gifts, and a cousin who was a school principal and choirmaster in the nearby city of Hainburg offered to take him into his home and train him. Haydn, not yet six years old, left home, never to return to the parental cottage except for rare, brief visits.

The young Haydn sang in the church choir, learned to play various instruments, and obtained a good basic knowledge of music. But his life changed decisively when he was eight years old. The musical director of St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna had observed the boy on a visit to Hainburg and invited him to serve as chorister at the Austrian capital’s most important church. Haydn’s parents accepted the offer, and thus in 1740 Haydn moved to Vienna. He stayed at the choir school for nine years, acquiring an enormous practical knowledge of music by constant performances but, to his disappointment, receiving little instruction in music theory. He had to work hard to fulfill his obligations as a chorister, and when his voice changed, he was expelled from both the cathedral choir and the choir school.

With no money and few possessions, Haydn at 17 was left to his own devices. He found refuge for a while in the garret of a fellow musician and supported himself “miserably” with odd musical jobs. He meanwhile undertook an arduous course of self-instruction through the study of musical works—notably those of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach—and of leading manuals of musical theory. A fortunate chance brought him to the attention of the Italian composer and singing teacher Nicola Porpora, who accepted him as accompanist for voice lessons and corrected Haydn’s compositions.

With persistence and energy, Haydn made progress. He was eventually introduced to the music-loving Austrian nobleman Karl Joseph von Fürnberg, in whose home he played chamber music. For the instrumentalists there he wrote his first string quartets.
Through the recommendation of Fürnberg, in 1758 Haydn was engaged as musical director and chamber composer for the Bohemian count Ferdinand Maximilian von Morzin. Haydn was put in charge of an orchestra of about 16 musicians, and for this ensemble he wrote his first symphony as well as numerous divertimenti for wind band or for wind instruments and strings. These early musical compositions were still conventional in character, yet a certain freshness of melodic invention and sparkle marked them as the work of a future master.

Esterházy patronage
Haydn stayed only briefly with von Morzin, as financial difficulties forced his patron to dismiss the orchestra. Soon Haydn was invited to enter the service of Prince Pál Antal Esterházy. The Esterházys were one of the wealthiest and most influential families of the Austrian empire and boasted a distinguished record of supporting music. Prince Pál Antal had a well-appointed orchestra performing regularly in his castle at Eisenstadt, a small town some 30 miles (48 km) from Vienna. Because his aged music director was ailing, the prince appointed the relatively unknown Haydn to be assistant conductor in 1761. While the music director oversaw church music, Haydn conducted the orchestra and coached the singers in almost daily rehearsals, composed most of the music required, and served as chief of the musical personnel. Haydn carried out his duties extremely well and revealed tact, good nature, and skill in dealing with people. From his first symphonies written for the Esterházys, Haydn amply displayed his characteristic good humour and wit, as well as the dependable freshness of his musical ideas, although full maturity would come much later. His employment by the Esterházy family proved decisive for his career, and he remained in their service until his death.

In 1766 Haydn became musical director at the Esterházy court. He raised the quality and increased the size of the prince’s musical ensembles by appointing many choice instrumentalists and singers. His ambitious plans were supported by Prince Miklós, who, on the death of his brother in 1762, had become head of the Esterházy family. He was able to appreciate Haydn’s musical contributions and created an atmosphere conducive to the development and maturing of Haydn’s art. In addition to composing operas for the court, Haydn composed symphonies, string quartets, and other chamber music. The prince was a passionate performer on the baryton, and Haydn provided for his patron more than 150 compositions featuring this now-obsolete cellolike instrument.

Haydn served Prince Miklós for nearly 30 years. He frequently visited Vienna in the prince’s retinue, and on these visits a close friendship developed between himself and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The two composers felt inspired by each other’s work. Mozart declared that he had learned from Haydn how to write quartets and dedicated a superb set of six such works to his “beloved friend.” Haydn’s music, too, shows the impact of his young friend. The mature composer was by no means set in his ways; he was flexible and receptive to new ideas.

During the 1760s Haydn’s fame began to spread throughout Europe. The Austrian and Czech monasteries did much to disseminate his church music as well as his symphonies, divertimenti, sonatas, and concertos. Aristocratic patrons in south Germany, Italy, and the Austrian empire assiduously collected his music, and their libraries would eventually become important sources for copies of his work.

The period from 1768 to about 1774 marks Haydn’s maturity as a composer. The music written then, from the Stabat Mater (1767) to the large-scale Missa Sancti Nicolai (1772), would be sufficient to place him among the chief composers of the era. The many operas he wrote during these years did much to enhance his own reputation and that of the Esterházy court. Among his other important works from this period are the string quartets of Opus 20, the Piano Sonata in C Minor, and the symphonies in minor keys, especially the so-called Trauersymphonie in E Minor, No. 44 (“Mourning Symphony,” so named because its slow movement, which was a particular favourite of the composer, was performed at a memorial service for Haydn) and the “Farewell” Symphony, No. 45. For reasons that have no historical grounding, this has come to be known as Haydn’s Sturm-und-Drang (“storm and stress”) period, after a literary movement that came somewhat later; however inapt historically, the term does describe the character of many of these works and in fact has come to stand for the turgid style they so often exhibit.


The following decade and a half did even more to enhance Haydn’s fame. His operatic output continued strong until 1785, notwithstanding the destruction of the Esterházy opera house by fire in 1779. Increasingly, however, his audience lay outside his employer’s court. In 1775 he composed his first large-scale oratorio, Il ritorno di Tobia, for the Musicians’ Society in Vienna; for unknown reasons, relations between Haydn and the Viennese musicians cooled considerably a few years later. By the early 1780s, though, things seemed much improved, and the Viennese firm Artaria published his six Opus 33 quartets. These important works quickly set a new standard for the genre, putting many of his competitors in this increasingly lucrative market out of business. (Mozart was a notable exception, but even he took several years to complete his own set of six quartets.) In 1784 Haydn revised Tobia for another Viennese performance, adding choral numbers and cutting back on some of the extended da capo structures, a clear sign that he was well aware of changing sensibilities. In mid-decade as well came a commission from Paris to compose a set of symphonies, and Haydn’s resulting “Paris” symphonies are a landmark of the genre. It was also about this time that he received the commission to compose the Seven Last Words of Our Saviour on the Cross; for the incorrigibly cheerful Haydn, writing seven successive dour movements was a particularly difficult undertaking, but the effort resulted in one of his most admired works.

Haydn’s professional success was not matched in his personal life. His marriage to Maria Anna Keller in 1760 produced neither a pleasant, peaceful home nor any children. Haydn’s wife did not understand music and showed no interest in her husband’s work. Her disdain went to the extremes of using his manuscripts for pastry pan linings or curl papers. Haydn was not insensitive to the attractions of other women, and for years he carried on a love affair with Luigia Polzelli, a young Italian mezzo-soprano in the prince’s service.

English period
When Prince Miklós died in 1790, he was succeeded by his son, Prince Antal, who did not care for music and dismissed most of the court musicians. Haydn was retained, however, and continued to receive his salary. No duties were required of him, enabling Haydn to do whatever he pleased. After such a long time at the Esterházy court, however, the composer was eager to try a different way of life. At this point a violinist and concert manager, Johann Peter Salomon, arrived from England and commissioned from Haydn 6 new symphonies and 20 smaller compositions to be conducted by the composer himself in a series of orchestral concerts in London sponsored by Salomon. Haydn gladly accepted this offer, and the two men set off for London in December 1790.

On New Year’s Day 1791, Haydn arrived in England, and the following 18 months proved extremely rewarding. The many novel impressions, the meeting with eminent musicians, and the admiration bestowed on him had a powerful impact on his creative work. He was feted, lionized, and treated as a genius; Charles Burney published a poem in his honour. The 12 symphonies he wrote on his first and second visits to London represent the climax of his orchestral output. Their virtuosity of instrumentation, masterly treatment of musical forms, and freely flowing melodic inspiration—not to mention their deft wit—endeared the works to British audiences. Their popularity is reflected in the various nicknames bestowed on them—e.g., The Surprise (No. 94), Military (No. 100), The Clock (No. 101), and Drumroll (No. 103).

In June 1792 Haydn left London for Germany. On his journey he stopped at Bonn, where the 22-year-old Ludwig van Beethoven was introduced to him, and it was arranged that the tempestuous young composer should move to Vienna to receive Haydn’s instruction. In a letter of 1793 to Beethoven’s patron, the elector of Cologne, Haydn stated that “Beethoven will one day be considered one of Europe’s greatest composers, and I shall be proud to be called his teacher.”

Haydn’s curiously cool reception on his return to Vienna in 1792 may have strengthened his decision to make a second journey to England in January 1794. The principal compositions of his second visit to London were the second set of London (or Salomon) symphonies (Nos. 99–104) and the six Apponyi quartets (Nos. 54–59). While in London, Haydn reached even greater heights of inspiration, particularly in the last three symphonies he wrote (Nos. 102–104), of which the Symphony No. 102 in B-flat Major is one of the greatest of all symphonies. The British public no longer regarded him as a sensation but as an old and well-loved friend. King George III earnestly invited him to stay in England, but Haydn—for reasons that have never been made clear—preferred to return to his native Austria to serve the new head of the Esterházy family, Prince Miklós II.

The late Esterházy and Viennese period
While in London in 1791, Haydn had been deeply moved by the performance of George Frideric Handel’s masterly oratorios. Deciding to compose further works in this genre, he obtained a suitable libretto, and, after settling in Vienna and resuming his duties for Prince Esterházy, he started work on the oratorio The Creation, the text of which had been translated into German by Baron Gottfried van Swieten. The work was planned and executed to enable performances in either German or English; it is believed to be the first musical work published with text underlay in two languages. The libretto was based on the epic poem Paradise Lost by John Milton and on the Genesis book of the Bible. Composing the oratorio proved a truly congenial task, and the years devoted to it were among the happiest in Haydn’s life. The Creation was first publicly performed in 1798 and earned enormous popularity subsequently. Haydn was thus encouraged to produce another oratorio, which absorbed him until 1801. An extended poem, The Seasons, by James Thomson, was chosen as the basis for the (much shorter) libretto, again adapted and translated—if somewhat awkwardly—by van Swieten so as to enable performance in either German or English. The libretto allowed Haydn to compose delightful musical analogues of events in nature, and as a result the oratorio achieved much success, both at the Austrian court and in public performances (although not in London). Yet its musical imagery was even then seen as old-fashioned—a circumstance ruefully acknowledged by Haydn, who blamed van Swieten’s poor advice regarding text setting.

Haydn’s late creative output included six masses written for his patron Miklós II; these are among the most significant masses of the 18th century. He also continued to compose magnificent string quartets, notably the six Erdödy quartets known as Opus 76. In 1797 Haydn gave to the Austrian nation the stirring song “Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser” (“God Save Emperor Francis”). It was used for more than a century as the national anthem of the Austrian monarchy and as the patriotic song “Deutschland, Deutschland über alles” (“Germany, Germany Above All Else”) in Germany, where it remains the national anthem as “Deutschlandlied.” The song was so beloved that Haydn decided to use it as a theme for variations in one of his finest string quartets, the Emperor Quartet (Opus 76, No. 3).

“The Seasons broke my back,” Haydn is reported to have said; and indeed, apart from the last two masses of 1801 and 1802, he undertook no more large-scale works. During the last years of his life, he was apparently incapable of further work. In 1809 Napoleon’s forces besieged Vienna and in May entered the city. Haydn refused to leave his house and take refuge in the inner city. Napoleon placed a guard of honour outside Haydn’s house, and the enfeebled composer was much touched by the visit of a French hussars’ officer who sang an aria from The Creation. On May 31 Haydn died peacefully, and he was buried two days later.

Works, development, and achievement
Haydn was an extremely prolific composer. His total output includes 108 symphonies, one of which (number 106) is lost and one of which (number 105) is actually a symphonie concertante; 68 string quartets; 32 divertimenti for small orchestra; 126 trios for baryton, viola, and cello; 29 trios for piano, violin, and cello; 21 trios for two violins and cello; 47 piano sonatas; about 20 operas; 14 masses; and 6 oratorios. Haydn’s achievement was long confused by the fact that an enormous number of works were wrongly attributed to him, and it was not until the 1950s that musicological research was able to pare this staggering amount of spurious attributions from Haydn’s recognized output. Work on a definitive catalog of his compositions continued into the late 20th century.

In his youth and early career, Haydn experimented with the prevailing stylistic trends. He was familiar with the pompous and complex idiom of the preceding Baroque period; he then adopted the light, gay, and elegant musical style that was popular at the time in Austria; and he was subsequently influenced by the strongly emotional and expressive style preferred by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and other north German composers. He eventually achieved his own distinctive musical identity by using some elements from all three of these styles simultaneously.

During the 1760s Haydn began to solidify and deepen his style. His new technique of working with small motifs to tighten the fabric of the sonata form turned the first movement of the sonata, quartet, and symphony into a little musical drama. In the period from 1768 to 1774, his music took on a deeper hue; the intellectualization that had steadily increased throughout the 1760s at last found its natural outlet in the mid-1780s, when he seems to have regained the emotional strength that so much of his work had lost after the outburst of the early 1770s. His Paris symphonies (Nos. 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, and 87; 1785–86) are miracles of beauty and formal perfection combined with great profundity, noticeable especially in the slow movement of No. 86 in D.

The London visits injected a new force in Haydn’s music, but, side by side with a greatly increased nervous tension, his works began to take on an emotional depth often characteristic of the music of an aging composer. Haydn began to explore new harmonic relationships, particularly in the late piano trios. On his return to Vienna he concentrated almost exclusively on vocal music and the string quartet. The last six masses he composed are pillars of symphonic strength and grandeur, ranging from the brightness of the Missa in tempore belli (1796) to the terse drama of the Nelson Mass in D minor (1798). Here the symphonic principles brought to perfection in the London symphonies are brilliantly combined with older contrapuntal forms (see counterpoint). Solo voices are blended with vocal quartet and choir, and there is a constant juxtaposition of the available forces. Haydn’s last instrumental works were the six Erdödy quartets (Opus 76; 1797), the two Lobkowitz quartets (Opus 77; 1799), and the “Unfinished” quartet (Opus 103; 1803). In these works he brought the art of the quartet to a new pinnacle that was not to be equaled until the quartets of Beethoven in his maturity.

Haydn was a true representative of the Enlightenment. His optimistic approach to life; his striving for a balance between intellect and emotion; his sense of moderation, leading to the avoidance of strongly discordant moods; all these found superb expression in his music and were appreciated by his contemporaries. Music lovers also found irresistible the nobility and deceptive simplicity of his idiom, sparked by delightful outbreaks of humour. The gaiety and naturalness of Haydn’s music held less appeal to the Romantic era of the 19th century, however, when dark, complex moods and ambivalent emotions were being explored in music; although many of his symphonies and quartets were performed with some frequency well past 1850, by the end of the century they had all but slipped from the repertory. But in the 20th century there was a reevaluation of Haydn’s work, and his outstanding thematic elaborations, his dependably engaging wit, the originality of his modulations, and the artistry and superb craftsmanship of his orchestration were again appreciated in full measure.

Karl Geiringer
H.C. Robbins Landon, Jr.
Raymond L. Knapp

Encyclopædia Britannica

 
 
 
 
 
Haydn was born in March 1732 into a Europe still dominated by powerful dynasties — the Hanovers in England, Bourbons in France, and Hapsburgs in Austria. The family lived on the borders between Austria and Hungary. Influenced from an early age by his father's love of folk music, Haydn was spotted by the choirmaster of Vienna's St Stephen's Cathedral at the age of eight. He was taken to Vienna and sang in the choir until his voice broke.

With borrowed money, Haydn bought a second-hand clavier; he then started to teach as well as to refine his playing and composition techniques. Along the way, he also met useful contacts, such as the fashionable poet Pietro Metastasio and the singing teacher Nicola Porpora, who taught Haydn composition.

In 1759 an aristocratic patron, Count Morzin, employed Haydn to supervise his private orchestra and Haydn wrote his first symphony. This attracted the attention of Prince Paul Esterhazy, who in 1761 appointed him vice-Kapellmeister. Haydn moved to the Eisenstadt court of this powerful and wealthy Hungarian family. The Prince, who himself played the violin and cello, wanted to enhance the court's image by encouraging orchestral and operatic music; this duly became the vice-Kapellmeister's duties.

The Prince died within a year and was replaced by his brother, who had even more expansive ideas, calling for a continuous stream of compositions, both operatic and instrumental, from Haydn. This Prince, Nikolaus the Magnificent, played the baryton (a six-stringed, bowed instrument). Haydn discreetly mastered it himself and over the years composed over 150 pieces for the Prince to play.

In 1764 Prince Nikolaus visited the Palace of Versailles, an experience that prompted him to build the glorious Esterhaza palace. With its 126 guest rooms and expansive gardens, built on what had been an inhospitable area of marshland by Lake Neusiedler, the palace became Haydn's home. The Esterhazys' increased status required yet more music — 14 stage works in as many years, quite apart from daily needs and special occasions. In 1768 the Prince built a 400-seat theatre in which he expected some kind of performance even day.
(Five years later he added a separate puppet theatre which also performed Haydn's operas. By then Haydn was in sole charge, the Kapellmeister having died in 1766, and in one year alone there were 125 performances of 17 operas.)
Those in service could not escape the sense of isolation on the stretch of damp marshland, estranged from their families. From 1766 to 1772 Haydn responded to this environment with a series of dark compositions, provoked also by the stirrings of the German literary movement later called Sturm und Drang (Storm and Stress). The intense string quartets that form Haydn's Opus 20 were composed at this time: with these pieces Haydn's reputation as founder of the classical string quartet was established. His next pieces m this form (Opus 33) so impressed Mozart that the younger composer dedicated six of his own quartets to Haydn.

Haydn was invited in 1784 to compose six symphonies by the Parisian Masonic Lodge. These became known as the Paris symphonies (Nos. 82—87) and were later followed by three more (Nos. 90-92). His fame spread to Spain and he was invited by Cadiz Cathedral to write for Good Friday the seven haunting movements of the oratorio Seven last words of our Saviour on the cross — for which he was apparently paid with a large chocolate cake stuffed with gold coins. He returned to this piece later, arranging it for string quartet and as a cantata with soloists.

In 1790 Prince Nikolaus died at the age of 77. In the wake of the French Revolution his son Anton curbed main' of the court's excesses and dismissed the orchestra but offered a substantial pension to Haydn in recognition of his long and distinguished service. Haydn went to London in January 1791. where he was immediately treated as a celebrity. Oxford University conferred an honorary degree on him. and Haydn repaid the compliment by composing Ins Oxford symphony (No. 92). During the two seasons of 1791—2 and 1794—5 he composed the 12 symphonies now known as the London symphonies. Various of these bear nicknames intended to attract audiences: The surprise (No. 94) includes a sudden loud chord at the start of the slow movement, and The dock (No. 101) has a "tick-cock" running throughout the slow movement.

After his acclaimed second season, various attempts were made to persuade him to remain in England. But after Prince Anton Esterhazy's death, the new Prince, Nikolaus II, wanted Haydn as his Kapellmeister. At the age of 59 Haydn returned to Eisenstadt and began shaping the musical life of the new court. In 1796 he wrote a Trumpet concerto for his friend Anton Weidinger, a trumpeter in the Vienna Court Orchestra. Three years previously, Weidinger had invented a type of trumpet with keys, and Haydn's concerto explored the possibilities of the new instrument.

The new Prince, however, was not fond of instrumental music, so Haydn began to write a series of Masses. These incorporated all his knowledge of opera and symphonies. Each had a theme and a name: the Missa in tempore belli (Mass in time of war, 1796); Heiligmesse (Holy Mass, 1796); Missa in angustiis (Nelson Mass. 1798); Theresienmesse (Theresia Mass. 1799); Schopfungsmesse (Creation Mass, 1801); and Hannoniemesse (Wind-band Mass, 1802).

Haydn's great oratorio The Creation was performed in 1798. Like the Masses. The Creation was an outlet for Haydn's devout religious feelings. Starting with a slow, mysterious depiction of chaos, the work falls into three parts — Creation of the earth; Creation of the living creatures; Creation of Adam and Eve - and is a loving portrait of nature, using music to mimic the flight of birds and the motion of the sea; even employing a contrabassoon -a rare instrument at the time — to represent the equally rare hippopotamus. The (Creation was followed by The Seasons, a secular oratorio based on a poem by James Thomson, first performed in Vienna's Schwarzenberg Palace in 1801.

Haydn was released from the Esterhazy family in 1804 after 40 years' service. He attended a gala performance of The Creation to honour his seventy-sixth birthday and was so moved by his reception that he had to be taken home before the end. Never again would he make a public appearance. As Napoleon's invading troops bombarded Vienna, the 77-year-old Haydn lay dying in his home on the outskirts of the city, and as a final mark of respect Napoleon placed a guard ot honour outside his Gumpendorf house.

 
 
 
 
Hob.I (1-108) Symphonies

Hob.I:1 1759? D major
Hob.I:2 1764 C major
Hob.I:3 1762 G major
Hob.I:4 1762 D major
Hob.I:5 1762 A major
Hob.I:6 “Le Matin” 1761 D major
Hob.I:7 “Le Midi” 1761? C major
Hob.I:8 “Le Soir” 1761? G major
Hob.I:9 1762 C major
Hob.I:10 1760 D major
Hob.I:11 1761 E♭ major
Hob.I:12 1763 E major
Hob.I:13 1763 D major
Hob.I:14 1764 A major
Hob.I:15 1764 D major
Hob.I:16 1763 B♭ major
Hob.I:17 1760-61 F major
Hob.I:18 1757-59 G major
Hob.I:19 1759-60 D major
Hob.I:20 1757/63? C major
Hob.I:21 1764 A major
Hob.I:22 “The Philosopher” 1764 E♭ major
Hob.I:23 1764 G major
Hob.I:24 1764 D major
Hob.I:25 1760/64? C major
Hob.I:26 “Lamentatione” 1768? D minor
Hob.I:27 1760? G major
Hob.I:28 1765 A major
Hob.I:29 1765 E major
Hob.I:30 “Alleluja” 1765 C major
Hob.I:31 “Hornsignal” 1765 D major
Hob.I:32 1760? C major
Hob.I:33 1760? C major
Hob.I:34 1766? D minor
Hob.I:35 1767 B♭ major
Hob.I:36 1761/65? E♭ major
Hob.I:37 1757/61? C major
Hob.I:38 “The Echo” 1766/68? C major
Hob.I:39 “Tempesta di mare” 1768? G minor
Hob.I:40 1763 F major
Hob.I:41 1769? C major
Hob.I:42 1771 D major
Hob.I:43 “Mercury” 1771? E♭ major
Hob.I:44 “Trauer” 1770-71 E minor
Hob.I:45 “Farewell” 1772 F♯ minor
Hob.I:46 1772 B major
Hob.I:47 “Palindrome” 1772 G major
Hob.I:48 “Maria Theresia” 1769? C major
Hob.I:49 “La Passione” 1768 F minor
Hob.I:50 1773 C major
Hob.I:51 1771/73? B♭ major
Hob.I:52 1771/73? C minor
Hob.I:53 “L’Impériale” 1777/79? D major
Hob.I:54 1774 G major
Hob.I:55 “Schoolmaster” 1774 E♭ major
Hob.I:56 1774 C major
Hob.I:57 1774 D major
Hob.I:58 1766-68? F major
Hob.I:59 “Fire” 1766-68? A major
Hob.I:60 “Il distratto” 1774 C major
Hob.I:61 1776 D major
Hob.I:62 1780? D major
Hob.I:63 “La Roxelane” 1777? C major
Hob.I:64 “Tempora mutantur” 1773? A major
Hob.I:65 1771/73? A major
Hob.I:66 1779? B♭ major
Hob.I:67 1779? F major
Hob.I:68 1779? B♭ major
Hob.I:69 “Laudon” 1779? C major
Hob.I:70 1779? D major
Hob.I:71 1780? B♭ major
Hob.I:72 1763-65? D major
Hob.I:73 “La Chasse” 1782? D major
Hob.I:74 1781? E♭ major
Hob.I:75 1781? D major
Hob.I:76 1782? E♭ major
Hob.I:77 1782? B♭ major
Hob.I:78 1782? C minor
Hob.I:79 1784? F major
Hob.I:80 1784? D minor
Hob.I:81 1784? G major
Hob.I:82 “L’Ours” 1786 C major Paris
Hob.I:83 “La Poule” 1785 G minor Paris
Hob.I:84 1786 E♭ major Paris
Hob.I:85 “La Reine” 1785-86 B♭ major Paris
Hob.I:86 1786 D major Paris
Hob.I:87 1785 A major Paris
Hob.I:88 1787? G major
Hob.I:89 1787 F major
Hob.I:90 1788 C major
Hob.I:91 1788 E♭ major
Hob.I:92 “Oxford” 1789 G major
Hob.I:93 1791 D major London No.2
Hob.I:94 “Surprise” 1791 G major London No. 3
Hob.I:95 1791 C minor London No.5
Hob.I:96 “The Miracle” 1791 D major London No.6
Hob.I:97 1792 C major London No. 1
Hob.I:98 1792 B♭ major London No. 4
Hob.I:99 1793 E♭ major London No. 10
Hob.I:100 “Military” 1794 G major London No. 12
Hob.I:101 “The Clock” 1794 D major London No.11
Hob.I:102 1794 B♭ major London No.9
Hob.I:103 “Drum-roll” 1795 E♭ major London No.8
Hob.I:104 “London” 1795 D major London No.7
Hob.I:105 Concertante 1792 B♭ major
Hob.I:106 lost
Hob.I:107 “A” 1757/61? B♭ major
Hob.I:108 “B” 1757/61? B♭ major
 
 
 
 
 
Hob.Ia (1-16) Ouvertures

Hob.Ia:1 L'infedelta delusa Strings, flute, 2 oboes, bassoon, 2 horns (and kettledrums?) ca. 1769-73 C major see also: Hob. XXVIII:5
Hob.Ia:2 Il Ritorno di Tobia Strings, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, kettledrums 1774 C major see also: Hob. XXI:1
Hob.Ia:3 L'Anima del Filosofo Orchestra 1794 ? C major see also: Hob. XXVIII:13
Hob.Ia:4 Overture Strings, flute, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns 1776-85 D major
Hob.Ia:5 Acide e Galatea Strings, 2 oboes, 2 horns 1762 D major see also: Hob. XXVIII:1
Hob.Ia:6 L'incontro improvviso 2 violins, viola, violoncello solo, bass, 2 oboes, bassoon, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, kettledrum, drum, cymbal 1782 D major see also: Hob. XXVIII:6
Hob.Ia:7 Overture Strings, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns 1777 D major alternate finale of Symphoy No. 53
Hob.Ia:7 bis Overture Strings, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns 1777 D major a malapropism of overture Hob. Ia:7
Hob.Ia:8 Philemon and Baucis Strings, 2 oboes, 2 Horns 1773 D major see also: Hob. XXIX:2
Hob.Ia:9 King Lear Strings, 2 flutes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns ? E♭ major Composed by W. G. Stegmann
Hob.Ia:10 Lo Speziale Strings, flute, 2 Oboes, bassoon, 2 horns 1782 G major Some sources list this work as overture of "La vera costanza".
Hob.Ia:11 La Fedeltà premiata Orchestra 1780 G major Prelude to the entrance choir of the first act of the opera „La Fedeltà premiata” - see also: Hob. XXVIII:10
Hob.Ia:12 Il Mondo della Luna Orchestra 1777 G minor Prelude of the third act of the opera "Il mondo della Luna" - see also: Hob. XXVIII:7
Hob.Ia:13 L'Isola disabitata Strings, flute, 2 oboes, bassoon, 2 horns 1779 G minor see also: Hob. XXVIII:9
Hob.Ia:14 Armida Strings, flute, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns 1783 B♭ major see also: Hob. XXVIII:13
Hob.Ia:15 La vera Costanza Strings, 2 oboes, bassoon, 2 horns 1777 B♭ major see also: Hob. XXVIII:8
Hob.Ia:16 Orlando Paladino Strings, 2 Oboes, bassoon, 2 horns 1782 B♭ major see also: Hob. XXVIII:13
Hob.Ia:17 La Fedeltà premiata Strings, flute, 2 oboes, bassoon, 2 horns or trumpets, kettledrum 1780 - see also: Hob. XXVIII:10
Hob.Ia:C1 Overture Orchestra ? C major
Hob.Ia:C2 Overture Orchestra ? C major
Hob.Ia:D1 Overture Orchestra ? D major
Hob.Ia:D2 Overture Orchestra ? D major
Hob.Ia:D3 Overture Orchestra ? D major
Hob.Ia:D4 Overture ? D major Fragment of a cantata, title "D'onora al piede pongansi"






Hob.II (1-47) Divertimentos in 4 and more Parts


Hob.II:1 Strings ca. 1769-73 C major
Hob.II:3 2 Ob, 2 Hn, 2 Bsn 1760 G major
Hob.II:6 Strings before 1765 E-flat major
Hob.II:7 2 Ob, 2 Hn, 2 Bsn ? C major
Hob.II:11 Flute, oboe, 2 violins, cello, bass before 1754 C major
Hob.II:14 2 Cl, 2 Hn 1766 C major
Hob.II:15 2 Ob, 2 Hn, 2 Bsn 1760 F major
Hob.II:23 2 Ob, 2 Hn, 2 Bsn before 1765 F major
Hob.II:27 Notturno No.8 Orchestra 1786 G major
Hob.II:39 "Echo" 4 Vl, 2 Vcl 1761 E-flat major
Hob.II:46 2 Ob, 2Hn, 3 Bsn, Contrabsn before 1782 B-flat major
Hob.II:D9 Strings ? D major
Hob.II:D10 Strings ? D major
Hob.II:D11 Strings ? D major
Hob.II:G4 Strings ? G major






Hob.III (1-83b) String Quartets



Hob.III:1 “La chasse” Strings B-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.1 No. 1
Hob.III:2 Strings E-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.1 No. 2
Hob.III:3 Strings D major 6 String Quartets, Op.1 No. 3
Hob.III:4 Strings G major 6 String Quartets, Op.1 No. 4
Hob.III:5 Strings B-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.1 No. 5
Hob.III:6 Strings C major 6 String Quartets, Op.1 No. 6
Hob.III:7 Strings A major 6 String Quartets, Op.2 No. 1
Hob.III:8 Strings E major 6 String Quartets, Op.2 No. 2
Hob.III:9 Strings E-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.2 No. 3
Hob.III:10 Strings F major 6 String Quartets, Op.2 No. 4
Hob.III:11 Strings D major 6 String Quartets, Op.2 No. 5
Hob.III:12 Strings B-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.2 No. 6
Hob.III:13 Strings E minor 6 String Quartets, Op.3 No. 1
Hob.III:14 Strings C major 6 String Quartets, Op.3 No. 2
Hob.III:15 Strings G major 6 String Quartets, Op.3 No. 3
Hob.III:16 Strings B-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.3 No. 4
Hob.III:17 Strings F major 6 String Quartets, Op.3 No. 5
Hob.III:18 Strings A major 6 String Quartets, Op.3 No. 6
Hob.III:19 Strings C major 6 String Quartets, Op.9 No. 1
Hob.III:20 Strings E-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.9 No. 2
Hob.III:21 Strings G major 6 String Quartets, Op.9 No. 3
Hob.III:22 Strings D minor 6 String Quartets, Op.9 No. 4
Hob.III:23 Strings B-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.9 No. 5
Hob.III:24 Strings A major 6 String Quartets, Op.9 No. 6
Hob.III:25 Strings E major 6 String Quartets, Op.17 No. 1
Hob.III:26 Strings F major 6 String Quartets, Op.17 No. 2
Hob.III:27 Strings E-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.17 No. 3
Hob.III:28 Strings C minor 6 String Quartets, Op.17 No. 4
Hob.III:29 Strings G major 6 String Quartets, Op.17 No. 5
Hob.III:30 Strings D major 6 String Quartets, Op.17 No. 6
Hob.III:31 Strings E-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.20 No. 1
Hob.III:32 Strings C major 6 String Quartets, Op.20 No. 2
Hob.III:33 Strings G minor 6 String Quartets, Op.20 No. 3
Hob.III:34 Strings D major 6 String Quartets, Op.20 No. 4
Hob.III:35 Strings F minor 6 String Quartets, Op.20 No. 5
Hob.III:36 Strings A major 6 String Quartets, Op.20 No. 6
Hob.III:37 Strings B minor 6 String Quartets, Op.33 No. 1
Hob.III:38 “The Joke” Strings E-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.33 No. 2
Hob.III:39 “The Bird” Strings C major 6 String Quartets, Op.33 No. 3
Hob.III:40 Strings B-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.33 No. 4
Hob.III:41 “How do you do?” Strings G major 6 String Quartets, Op.33 No. 5
Hob.III:42 Strings D major 6 String Quartets, Op.33 No. 6
Hob.III:43 Strings D major
Hob.III:44 Strings B-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.50 “Prussian” No. 1
Hob.III:45 Strings C major 6 String Quartets, Op.50 “Prussian” No. 2
Hob.III:46 Strings E-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.50 “Prussian” No. 3
Hob.III:47 Strings in F-sharp minor 6 String Quartets, Op.50 “Prussian” No. 4
Hob.III:48 Strings F major 6 String Quartets, Op.50 “Prussian” No. 5
Hob.III:49 “La grenouille” Strings D major 6 String Quartets, Op.50 “Prussian” No. 6
Hob.III:50 Strings B-flat major 7 String Quartets, Op.51 “Seven Last Words of Christ” No. 1
Hob.III:51 Strings C minor 7 String Quartets, Op.51 “Seven Last Words of Christ” No. 2
Hob.III:52 Strings E major 7 String Quartets, Op.51 “Seven Last Words of Christ” No. 3
Hob.III:53 Strings F major 7 String Quartets, Op.51 “Seven Last Words of Christ” No. 4
Hob.III:54 Strings A major 7 String Quartets, Op.51 “Seven Last Words of Christ” No. 5
Hob.III:55 Strings G minor 7 String Quartets, Op.51 “Seven Last Words of Christ” No. 6
Hob.III:56 Strings E-flat major 7 String Quartets, Op.51 “Seven Last Words of Christ” No. 7
Hob.III:57 Strings G major 3 String Quartets, Op.54 “Tost I” No. 2
Hob.III:58 Strings C major 3 String Quartets, Op.54 “Tost I” No. 1
Hob.III:59 Strings E major 3 String Quartets, Op.54 “Tost I” No. 3
Hob.III:60 Strings A major 3 String Quartets, Op.55 “Tost II” No. 1
Hob.III:61 “Le rasoir” Strings in F minor and major 3 String Quartets, Op.55 “Tost II” No. 2
Hob.III:62 Strings B-flat major 3 String Quartets, Op.55 “Tost II” No. 3
Hob.III:63 Strings D major 6 String Quartets, Op.64 “Tost III” No. 5
Hob.III:64 Strings E-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.64 “Tost III” No. 6
Hob.III:65 Strings C major 6 String Quartets, Op.64 “Tost III” No. 1
Hob.III:66 Strings G major 6 String Quartets, Op.64 “Tost III” No. 4
Hob.III:67 Strings B-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.64 “Tost III” No. 3
Hob.III:68 Strings B minor 6 String Quartets, Op.64 “Tost III” No. 2
Hob.III:69 Strings B-flat major 3 String Quartets, Op.71 “Apponyi” No. 1
Hob.III:70 Strings D major 3 String Quartets, Op.71 “Apponyi” No. 2
Hob.III:71 Strings E-flat major 3 String Quartets, Op.71 “Apponyi” No. 3
Hob.III:72 Strings C major 3 String Quartets, Op.74 “Apponyi” No. 1
Hob.III:73 Strings F major 3 String Quartets, Op.74 “Apponyi” No. 2
Hob.III:74 “The Horseman” Strings G minor 3 String Quartets, Op.74 “Apponyi” No. 3
Hob.III:75 Strings G major 6 String Quartets, Op.76 “Erdody” No. 1
Hob.III:76 Strings D minor 6 String Quartets, Op.76 “Erdody” No. 2
Hob.III:77 “Emperor” Strings C major 6 String Quartets, Op.76 “Erdody” No. 3
Hob.III:78 “Sunrise” Strings B-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.76 “Erdody” No. 4
Hob.III:79 Strings D major 6 String Quartets, Op.76 “Erdody” No. 5
Hob.III:80 Strings E-flat major 6 String Quartets, Op.76 “Erdody” No. 6
Hob.III:81 Strings G major 2 String Quartets, Op.77 “Lobkowitz” No. 1
Hob.III:82 Strings F major 2 String Quartets, Op.77 “Lobkowitz” No. 2
Hob.III:83 Strings D minor String Quartet in D minor, Op.103, incomplete




Hob.IV (1-11) Divertimentos in 3 Parts



Hob.IV:1 Divertimento 2 flutes, cello 1794 C major
Hob.IV:6 Divertimento 2 violins (or flute, violin), cello 1784 D major
Hob.IV:7 Divertimento 2 violins (or flute, violin), cello 1784 G major
Hob.IV:8 Divertimento 2 violins (or flute, violin), cello 1784 C major
Hob.IV:9 Divertimento 2 violins (or flute, violin), cello 1784 G major
Hob.IV:10 Divertimento 2 violins (or flute, violin), cello 1784 A major
Hob.IV:11 Divertimento 2 violins (or flute, violin), cello 1784 D major







Hob.V (1-21) String Trios


Hob.V:15 Trio 2 Vl, Vcl before 1763 D major
Hob.V:16 Trio 2 Vl, Vcl before 1767 C major
Hob.V:18 Trio 2 Vl, Vcl before 1766 B-flat major
Hob.V:19 Trio 2 Vl, Vcl before 1766 E major
Hob.V:D2 Trio 2 Vl, Bc ? D major
Hob.V:F1 Trio 2 Vl, Bc ? F major






Hob.VI (1-6) Various Duos


Hob.VI:D2 Sonata for 2 Violins 2 Vl ? D major
Hob.VI:Es2 Sonata for 2 Violins 2 Vl ? E-flat major
Hob.VI:F1 Sonata for 2 Violins 2 Vl ? F major
Hob.VI:G1 Sonata for 2 Violins 2 Vl ? G major
Hob.VI:A1 Sonata for 2 Violins 2 Vl ? A major
Hob.VI:B1 Sonata for 2 Violins 2 Vl ? B-flat major
Hob VI Anh. 3 Duets for 2 Violins 2 Vl ? B-flat major
E-flat major
B-flat major Op.99





Hob.VII Concertos for Various Instruments

Hob.VIIa:1 Violin Concerto in C major Vl, Strings ca. 1765 C major
Hob.VIIa:2 Violin Concerto in D major Vl, Strings 1765 D major lost
Hob.VIIa:3 Violin Concerto in A major Vl, Strings ca. 1770 A major
Hob.VIIa:4 Violin Concerto in G major Vl, Strings 1769 G major
Hob.VIIa:D1 Violin Concerto, in D major Vl, Orch D major by Carl Stamitz?
Hob.VIIa:G1 Violin Concerto in G major Vl, Strings G major by Michael Haydn?
Hob.VIIa:A1 Violin Concerto in A major Vl, Strings A major by Giornovichi?
Hob.VIIa:B1 Violin Concerto in G major Vl, Strings B-flat major by Michael Haydn
Hob.VIIa:B2 Violin Concerto in B-flat major Vl, Strings B-flat major spurious; composed by Christian Cannabich

Hob.VIIb Concertos for Violoncello

Hob. VIIb:1 Cello Concerto No.1 Cello, Orchestra 1761-65 C major
Hob. VIIb:2 Cello Concerto No.2 Cello, Orchestra 1783 D major
Hob. VIIb:3 Cello Concerto No.3 ? 1761–65 ? C major lost
Hob. VIIb:4 Cello Concerto No.4 Cello, Strings 1772? D major now attributed to Giovanni Battista Costanzi
Hob. VIIb:5 Cello Concerto No.5 Cello, Orchestra ? C major now attribute to David Popper
Hob. VIIb:g1 Cello Concerto Cello, Strings 1773? G minor

Hob.VIIc Concerto for Contrabass

Hob. VIIc:1 Contrabass Concerto No.1 Contrabass, Strings D major lost, may have been burned and destroyed?

Hob.VIId Concertos for Horn


Hob. VIId:1 Horn Concerto Horn, Strings 1765 D major lost
Hob. VIId:2 Concerto for 2 Horns 2 Horns, Strings E-flat major lost
Hob. VIId:3 Hornkonzert Nr.1 Horn, Strings 1762 D major lost
Hob. VIId:4 Hornkonzert Nr.2 Horn, Strings 1781 D major authentic?
Hob. VIId:5 Concerto for 2 Horns 2 Horns, Strings E-flat major attrib.; may be Hob. VIId:2?

Hob.VIIe Concert for Trumpet

Hob. VIIe:1 Trumpet Concerto Trumpet, Strings 1796 E-flat major 1. Allegro 2. Andante 3. Allegro.

Hob.VIIf Concerto for Flute


Hob. VIIf:1 Flute Concerto Flute, Strings before 1780? D major
Hob. VIIf:D1 Flute Concerto Flute, Strings D major by Leopold Hoffmann

Hob.VIIg Concerto for Oboe

Hob VIIg:C1 Oboe Concerto Oboe, Strings 179? C major not authentic, probably not by Haydn?

Hob.VIIh Concerto for 2 „Lyra organizzata“

VIIh:1 Concerto for 2 "Lyra organizzata" 2 Lyra, 2 Horns, 2 Vl, 2 Vla, Bc 1786 C major
VIIh:2 Concerto for 2 "Lyra organizzata" 2 Lyra, 2 Horns, 2 Vl, 2 Vla, Bc 1786 G major
VIIh:3 Concerto for 2 "Lyra organizzata" 2 Lyra, 2 Horns, 2 Vl, 2 Vla, Bc 1786 G major
VIIh:4 Concerto for 2 "Lyra organizzata" 2 Lyra, 2 Horns, 2 Vl, 2 Vla, Bc 1786 F major
VIIh:5 Concerto for 2 "Lyra organizzata" 2 Lyra, 2 Horns, 2 Vl, 2 Vla, Bc 1786 F major





Hob.VIII (1-7) Marches

Hob.IX (1-29) Dances


Hob.IX:10 12 German Dances Keyboard before 1793 various
Hob.IX:22 10 Menuets Piano ? various

Hob.X (1-12) Various Works for Baryton






Hob.XI (1-126) Trios for Baryton, Violin or Viola and Cello

Hob.XI:1 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:2 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:3 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:4 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:5 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:6 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:7 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:8 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:9 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 D major
Hob.XI:10 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello A major
Hob.XI:11 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 F major
Hob.XI:14 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello D major
Hob.XI:15 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello A major
Hob.XI:16 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello A major
Hob.XI:17 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 D major
Hob.XI:19 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello A major
Hob.XI:25 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello A major
Hob.XI:26 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello 1766-67 G major
Hob.XI:27 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello D major
Hob.XI:30 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello G major
Hob.XI:34 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 D major
Hob.XI:35 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello 1776 A major
Hob.XI:36 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello D major
Hob.XI:37 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello G major
Hob.XI:38 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:39 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello 1776 A major
Hob.XI:44 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello D major
Hob.XI:45 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello 1766-67 D major
Hob.XI:48 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello D major
Hob.XI:53 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:56 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 D major
Hob.XI:70 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 G major
Hob.XI:72 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 D major
Hob.XI:74 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello D major
Hob.XI:75 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 A major
Hob.XI:76 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello C major
Hob.XI:77 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello G major
Hob.XI:80 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello G major
Hob.XI:82 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:87 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello A minor
Hob.XI:96 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:100 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:101 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:103 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:106 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello D major
Hob.XI:108 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello A major
Hob.XI:109 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:110 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:111 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello G major
Hob.XI:113 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello before 1773 D major
Hob.XI:114 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:116 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello G major
Hob.XI:117 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:118 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:120 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello D major
Hob.XI:123 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:124 Baryton Trio Baryton, Viola, Violoncello
Hob.XI:C2 Divertimento (Trio) Flute, Violin, Bass C major spurious

Hob.XII (1-25) Duos with Baryton

Hob.XIII (1-3) Concertos for Baryton
There are 3 Concertos for Baryton (italian: Viola di bordone) known but are either lost or whereabouts unknown.

Hob. XIII:1 Concerto for Baryton Baryton, 2 Vl, Bc before 1770 D major
Hob. XIII:2 Concerto for Baryton Baryton, 2 Vl, Bc before 1770 D major
Hob. XIII:3 Concerto for Baryton 2 Barytons, 2 Vl, Bc before 1770 D major

Hob.XIV (1-13) Divertimentos with Piano

Hob.XV (1-40) Trios for Piano, Violin or Flute and Cello
Piano Trio, Hob.XV:1 (Haydn, Joseph)
Piano Trio, Hob.XV:2 (Haydn, Joseph)
3 Piano Trios, Hob.XV:3-5 (Op.40) (Haydn, Joseph)
3 Piano Trios, Hob.XV:6-8 (Op.43) (Haydn, Joseph)
3 Piano Trios, Hob.XV:9-10 (Op.27) (Haydn, Joseph)
3 Piano Trios, Hob.XV:11-13 (Op.57) (Haydn, Joseph)
Piano Trio, Hob.XV:14 (Op.39) (Haydn, Joseph)
2 Piano Trios, Hob.XV:15-16 (Op.67) (Haydn, Joseph)
Piano Trio, Hob.XV:17 (Haydn, Joseph)
3 Piano Trios, Hob.XV:18-20 (Op.36) (Haydn, Joseph)
3 Piano Trios, Hob.XV:21-23 (Op.71) (Haydn, Joseph)
3 Piano Trios, Hob.XV:24-26 (Op.82) (Haydn, Joseph)
3 Piano Trios, Hob.XV:27-29 (Haydn, Joseph)
Piano Trio, Hob.XV:30 (Haydn, Joseph)
Piano Trio, Hob.XV:31 (Haydn, Joseph)
Hob.XV:32
Hob.XVa Piano Duos

Hob.XVI (1-52) Piano Sonatas
3 String Trios, Op.53 (Haydn, Joseph)

Hob.XVII (1-12) Piano Pieces
Variations in E-flat major, Hob.XVII:3 (Haydn, Joseph)
Fantasia in C major, Hob.XVII:4 (Haydn, Joseph)
Variations in F minor, Hob.XVII:6 (Haydn, Joseph)
Il Maestro e Lo Scolare, Hob.XVIIa:1 (Haydn, Joseph)
Hob.XVII Anh.
Hob.XVIIa (1-2) Piano 4 Hands

Hob.XVIII (1-11) Keyboard Concertos
Hob.XVIII:1 - Keyboard Concerto in C major
Hob.XVIII:2 - Keyboard Concerto in D major
Hob.XVIII:3 - Keyboard Concerto in F major
Hob.XVIII:4 - Keyboard Concerto in G major
Hob.XVIII:5 - Keyboard Concerto in C major
Hob.XVIII:6 - Keyboard Concerto in F major
Hob.XVIII:7 - Keyboard Concerto in F major
Hob.XVIII:8 - Keyboard Concerto in G major
Hob.XVIII:9 - Keyboard Concerto in G major
Hob.XVIII:10 - Keyboard Concerto in C major
Hob.XVIII:11 - Keyboard Concerto in D major

Hob.XIX (1-32) Pieces for Mechanical Clock (Flötenuhr)
Flötenuhrstücke, Hob.XIX:1-32 (Haydn, Joseph)

Hob.XX Instrumental Works about The Seven Last Words of Christ
Die Worte des Erlösers am Kreuze, Hob.XX (Haydn, Joseph)
Hob.XX-2 Choral Version of The Seven Last Words of Christ
Stabat Mater, Hob.XXa:1 (Haydn, Joseph)

Hob.XXI (1-3) Oratorios
Il Ritorno di Tobia, Hob.XXI:1 (Haydn, Joseph)
Die Schöpfung, Hob.XXI:2 (Haydn, Joseph)
Die Jahreszeiten, Hob.XXI:3 (Haydn, Joseph)
Unfinished Oratorio (Haydn, Joseph)





Hob.XXII (1-14) Masses

Mass in B-flat major, Hob.XXII:10 (Haydn, Joseph)
Mass in B-flat major, Hob.XXII:12 (Haydn, Joseph)
Mass in C major, Hob.XXII:9 (Haydn, Joseph)
Mass in D minor, Hob.XXII:11 (Haydn, Joseph)
Missa in B-flat major, Hob.XXII:14 (Haydn, Joseph)

Hob.XXIII Other Sacred Works

Hob.XXIIIb:2 Salve Regina Soli (SATB), mixed chorus, solo organ, strings 1771 G minor
Hob.XXIV Cantatas and Arias with Orchestra

Hob.XXIVa:9 Unfinished Oratorio Bass Voice, Chorus, Orchestra 1794 D minor/major
Hob.XXV Songs with 2, 3, and 4 Parts

Hob.XXVc:2 Die Harmonie in der Ehe Voices (SATB) and Continuo 1796-1799 B♭ major
Hob.XXVc:8 Aus dem Danklied zu Gott SATB voices + Harpsichord 1796-1799 E♭ major
Hob.XXVI Songs and Cantatas with Keyboard

Hob.XXVIa:1-12 12 Songs of various poets Voice, keyboard 1781
Hob.XXVIa:13-24 12 Songs of various poets Voice, keyboard 1780–84
Hob.XXVIa:43 Kaiserlied Soprano, keyboard 1797
Hob.XXVIa:45 Ein kleines Haus Soprano, keyboard 1801
Hob.XXVIb:2 Arianna a Naxos Soprano, keyboard before 1790
Hob.XXVII (Sacred 1-10, Secular 1-47) Canons
Hob XXVIIb:9, 43, 10, 12, 11, 39, 34, 16, 17, 14, 41, 13, 44, 38, 42, 20, 37, 18, 3, 36, 35, 19, 29, 30, 32, 21, 15, 33, 40
Hob.XXVIII (1-13) Operas

Hob.XXVIII:9 L'Isola disabitata 2 Soprano (Costanza, Silvia), Tenore (Gernando), Basso (Enrico), strings, fl, 2 ob, bsn, 2 horns, timp 1779 D major Azione teatrale in due parte, libretto by Pietro Metastasio
Hob.XXIX Singspiele
Hob.XXX Incidental Music
Hob.XXXI (Scottish: 1-273, Welsh: 1-60) Arrangement of Folksongs
 
 
 
 
 

 

Daniele Giorgi direct.the Orchestra Pistoiese Promusica, Umberto Clerici - cello

Concerto for cello and orchestra in C major Hob. VIIb/1

Moderato 
Adagio 
Allegro molto

Serg van Gennip
Sonate Gdur Hob XVI G1.

 

Piano Sonata No. 38 in F major (1 Moderato)

Symphony Nr. 85 "La Reine", 4th movement

Columbia University Orchestra
Symphony No. 88
Adagio - Allegro
Largo
Menuetto: Allegretto
Finale: Allegro con spirito

 

Sonate Gdur Hob XVI G1.

 

Allison Lovejoy
Sonata No. 34 in E minor, Presto

 

Andrew L. Simpson
Piano Sonata in E-Flat Major, Hob. XVI:49 
Allegro
Adagio
Finale

Natasha Paremski
Sonata in C Major

Patricia Kopatchinskaja
Piano Trio Hob.15, Nr. 25

Tel Aviv Trio  
Trio in C Major Hob. XV:21 for piano, violin and cello 
Adagio pastorale - Vivace assai 
Andante
Finale Prest

 

Lord Nelson Mass
Kyrie
Gloria
Qui Tollis
Quoniam
Credo

Et incarnatus
Et resurrexit
Sanctus
Benedictus
Agnus Dei
Dona Nobis

Long Beach Forty-Niner Choir, Golden west chamber Singers, and FVHS Troubadours
Soprano: Alina Artemova. Contralto: Erica Turrell. Tenor: Brian DehBass, Brad McMurray

 

Missa in Tempore Belli "Paukenmesse" in C major

Kyrie
Gloria I
Gloria II
Gloria III
Credo I
Credo II
Credo III
Sanctus
Benedictus
Agnus Dei I
Agnus Dei
I

St. Matthew's Adult Choir

 

Piano Trio in E major, Hob. XV:28
Allegro moderato
Allegretto 
Finale: Allegro

Die Schopfung (The Creation)
Uni Witten-Herdecke chor, Oratorium für Soli, Chor und Orchester Hob

Die Schöpfung Nr. 2-3
Die Schöpfung Nr. 5
Die Schöpfung Nr. 10-11
Die Schöpfung Nr. 14
Die Schöpfung Nr. 18-19
Die Schöpfung Nr. 26
Die Schöpfung Nr. 28
Die Schöpfung Nr. 31-3

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Best of Haydn
 
Published on Apr 3, 2013
S. Sound Philharmonic Orchestra - The Best of Haydn

1. Symphony no. 45, f# min, I Allegro Assai "Farewell"
2. Symphony no. 45, in f# min, II Adagio "Farewell" 5:51
3. Symphony no. 45, in f# min, III Minuetto "Farewell" 14:34
4. Symphony no. 45, in f# min, IV Finale "Farewell" 18:40
5. Symphony no. 46, in B, I Vivace 26:21
6. Symphony no. 46, in B, II Poco Adagio 35:12
7. Symphony no. 46, in B, III Allegretto 40:59
8. Symphony no. 46, in B, IV Presto e scherzando 43:54
9. Symphony no. 48 in C, I Allegro "Maria Theresia" 48:13
10. Symphony no.48 in C, II Adagio "Maria Theresia" 54:29
11. Symphony no.48 in C, III Minuetto "Maria Theresia" 1:06:07
12. Symphony no.48 in C, IV Allegro "Maria Theresia" 1:11:16
13. Symphony no.49 in F minor, I Adagio "La Passione" 1:14:35
14. Symphony no.49 in F minor, II Adagio "La Passione" 1:22:50
15. Symphony no.49 in F minor, III Minuetto "La Passione" 1:28:00
16. Symphony no.49 in F Minor, IV Presto "La Passione" 1:32:26
17. String Quartet no.3, in C, Op. 76 I Allegro "Emperor " 1:35:57
18. String Quartet no.3, in C, Op. 76 II Poco adagio "Emperor " 1:41:24
19. String Quartet no.3, in C, Op. 76 III Minuetto "Emperor " 1:49:40
20. String Quartet no.3, in C, Op. 76 IV Finale "Emperor " 1:54:37
21. Minuetto I Trio 1:59:03
22. Minuetto II 2:00:56

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony (No. 1, No. 2 & No. 3)
 
I. Symphony No. 1
II. Symphony No. 2 (from 13:28)
III. Symphony No. 3 (from 23:02)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : June 1990, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony (No. 4 & No. 5)
 
I. Symphony No. 4
II. Symphony No. 5 (from 17:36)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : June 1990, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony (No. 9 & No. 10)
 
I. Symphony No. 9
II. Symphony No. 10 (from 12:19)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : June 1990, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony (No. 11 & No. 12)
 
I. Symphony No. 11
II. Symphony No. 12 (from 22:39)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : June 1990, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony (No. 13, No. 14, No. 15 & No. 16)
 
I. Symphony No. 13
II. Symphony No. 14 (from 18:13)
III. Symphony No. 15 (from 33:15)
IV. Symphony No. 16 (from 53:10)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : April - May 1991, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony (No. 17, No 18, No. 19 & No. 20)
 

I. Symphony No. 17
II. Symphony No. 18 (from 14:51)
III. Symphony No. 19 (from 28:42)
IV. Symphony No. 20 (from 39:20)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : April - May 1991, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony (No. 21, No. 23 & No.24)
 

I. Symphony No. 21
II. Symphony No. 23 (from 16:02)
III. Symphony No. 24 (from 32:42)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : June 2000 (nos 21, 23) & April 1989 (24), Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony (No. 25, No. 27, No. 28 & No. 29)
 
I. Symphony No. 25
II. Symphony No. 27 (from 13:43)
III. Symphony No. 28 (from 27:27)
IV. Symphony No. 29 (from 45:16)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : June 2000 (nos 28,29) & June 1989 (nos 25,27), Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No. 41 & No. 42
 
I. Symphony No. 41
II. Symphony No. 42 (from 18:45)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : 1994 & 1995, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn - Symphony No. 44 'Trauer'
 
Orchestra of St. John's, Smith Square, London - John Lubbock, conductor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn / Symphony No. 45 in F-sharp minor "Farewell" (Mackerras)
 
Symphony No. 45 in F-sharp minor "Farewell", Hob. I:45 (1772)

00:00 - Allegro assai
07:08 - Adagio
21:36 - Menuet: Allegretto; Trio
26:22 - Finale: Presto; Adagio

Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of St. Luke's (Telarc: 1989).

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No. 50 & No. 51
 
I. Symphony No. 50
II. Symphony No. 51 (from 17:53)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : 1994 & 1995, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No. 52 & No. 54
 
I. Symphony No. 52
II. Symphony No. 54 (from 21:00)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : 1994 & 1995, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
The Symphony No. 52 in C minor is one of the last Sturm und Drang symphonies composed by the Austrian composer Joseph Haydn while the composer was in residence at Esterházy in 1771 or 1772..
It is one of a number of minor-key symphonies that Haydn composed in the late 1760s and early 1770s, the others being Symphonies Nos. 39, 44, 45, and 49. The symphony was described, perhaps optimistically, by the noted Haydn scholar H. C. Robbins Landon as "the grandfather of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, also created with mathematical precision and in extreme conciseness.". It may also have served as a model for Mozart's Piano Sonata K. 457.
Movements
The symphony is scored for two oboes, bassoon, two horns (in C alto), continuo (harpsichord) and strings. This symphony is divided into four movements:
1. Allegro assai con brio 0:50
2. Andante, 3/8 8:51
3. Menuetto e trio. Allegretto, 3/4 13:11
4. Finale. Presto 16:32
The symphony has several distinct features. The first movement, written in Sonata-Allegro form, establishes a contrast between an agitated and forte opening theme in C minor, and a lyrical and piano second theme in the relative major (E-flat). Somewhat unusually, Haydn presents the second theme twice with transitional material in between its appearances. As with his Symphony No. 45, the movement employs deceptive progressions in both the exposition (mm. 36--37) and recapitulation (mm. 130-31). The "anger and vehemence" established by the minor mode of the symphony surpasses Haydn's earlier minor key symphonic efforts.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No. 56 & No. 57
 
I. Symphony No. 56
II. Symphony No. 57 (from 24:45)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : 1996, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 60 C major 'Il Distratto' R Norrington
 
The Symphony No. 60 in C major, Hoboken I/60, was written by Joseph Haydn. It is sometimes given the nickname Il Distratto (The Distracted), or in German, »Der Zerstreute«.
Nickname
It was completed in or by 1775 (most likely, November 1774.) The symphony makes use of music Haydn wrote for a play, Le Distrait, by Jean-François Regnard, given a German revival in 1774 by Karl Wahr under the German title »Der Zerstreute« (Il Distratto is the title that appears on Haydn's incidental music, however). Symphony no. 60 contains the overture, four entr'actes and finale from the music composed for the five-act play.
Movements
The symphony is scored for two oboes, two horns, two optional trumpets, timpani, and strings.
1. Adagio, 2/4 - Allegro di molto, 3/4 0:00
2. Andante, 2/4 in G major 8:56
3. Menuetto - Trio, 3/4 (Trio in C minor) 17:00
4. Presto, 2/4 in C minor and major 21:40
5. Adagio (di Lamentatione), 2/4 in F major 24:55
6. Finale: Prestissimo, 2/4 28:44
The slow introduction to the first movement overture opens with a fanfare similar to the one that opens the 50th symphony which also served an overture to a stage work. The ensuing Allegro is in sonata form. The second theme has a section that is notably marked perdendosi ("dying away") which Sisman associates with the absent-mindedness of the main character of the play. In the development section, the falling arpeggio motif that opens the Farewell Symphony is quoted and repeated at different pitch levels.
The slow movement features an alternation between a lyrical string motif and an oboe/horn fanfare. From a theatrical standpoint, this suggests a dialogue between two characters in the play — a well-bred young lady and a carousing soldier — but Haydn had also juxtaposed these types of themes in the slow movements of his 28th and 65th symphonies. The development section contains a parody of a French folk dance.
The courtly and pompous minuet is contrasted by the reappearance of the absent-minded main character in the trio, which features an exotically wandering, rising and falling motif over a bagpipe-like drone.
The fifth movement (adagio) briefly introduces timpani and trumpets, not to be found again in a Haydn symphonic slow movement until Symphony No. 88.
The finale features one of Haydn's famous musical jokes: the energetic prestissimo opening grinds to a sudden halt following a spectacularly discordant orchestral flourish, as the violins discover that they seemingly "need" to retune their strings — which they noisily proceed to do for 10 to 15 seconds before they resume playing.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No. 61 & No. 62
 
I. Symphony No. 61
II. Symphony No. 62 (from 20:42)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : 1996, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No. 65 & No. 66
 
I. Symphony No. 65
II. Symphony No. 66 (from 17:11)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : 1997, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No. 70 No. 71 & No. 72
 
I. Symphony No. 70
II. Symphony No. 71 (from 17:19)
III. Symphony No. 72 (from 39:59)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : 1997 & 1998, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No. 76, No. 77, & No. 78
 
I. Symphony No. 76
II. Symphony No. 77 (from 20:51)
III. Symphony No. 78 (from 38:59)

Austro - Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer

Recording : 1998, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 81 G major Christopher Hogwood
 
The Symphony No. 81 in G major (Hoboken 1/81) is a symphony by Joseph Haydn was composed in 1784 as part of a trio of symphonies that also included symphonies 79 and 80.
Movements
It is scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns and strings.
1. Vivace 0:15
2. Andante, 6/8 10:10
3. Menuetto and trio: Allegretto, 3/4 17:40
4. Finale: Allegro ma non troppo, 2/2 22:27
In the first and third movements, Haydn explores "ambiguities of tonality ... which eventually reach their peak of subtlety" of the first movement of Symphony No. 94. The first movement begins "with an unusual and exciting pedal point ... [and] uses a subsidiary subject that appears like a cordial greeting to the newly won friend [Mozart]." The pedals and dissonances point to Mozart's K. 465.
The second movement is a siciliano theme with three variations. The variations are for the most part strophic and straightforward with the exception of a minor-key interlude in the center of the movement between the first and second variations. The final variation contains the fullest orchestration with pizzicato accompaniment and serves to recapitulate the movement.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn The Paris Symphonies Nos. 82, 83, 84
 
Symphony No. 82 in C major ("The Bear"), H. 1/82 0:00
Symphony No. 83 in G minor ("The Hen"), H. 1/83 25:19
Symphony No. 84 in E flat major ("In Nomine Domini"), H. 1/84 48:47

Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century
Frans Brüggen Conductor

 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 88 G major, Bernstein Wiener Philarmoniker
 
The Symphony No. 88 in G major (Hoboken 1/88) was written by Joseph Haydn. It is occasionally referred to as The Letter V referring to an older method of cataloguing Haydn's symphonic output.
The symphony was completed in 1787. It is one of Haydn's best-known works, even though it is not one of the Paris or London Symphonies and does not have a descriptive nickname.
Movements
The work is in standard four movement form and scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, continuo (harpsichord) and strings.
1. Adagio - Allegro 0:42
2. Largo 9:57
3. Menuetto: Allegretto 17:14
4. Finale. Allegro con spirito 21:39
The first movement begins with a brief introduction which quickly settles to the dominant chord to prepare for the main body of the movement. The strings open the Allegro stating the main theme and the rest of the movement develops from there, with almost every statement deriving from a previous idea. The exposition is monothematic and the development continues to make use of that single melodic idea. In the recapitulation, the initial statement of the theme is embellished by a solo flute.
The slow movement in D major consists mainly of embellishments of the legato oboe theme which opens it, though every so often is punctuated by chords played by the whole orchestra. After hearing this slow movement, Johannes Brahms is said to have remarked, 'I want my Ninth Symphony to sound like this'. It is the first of Haydn's symphonies to use trumpets and timpani in the slow movement. Mozart had previously used trumpets and timpani in the slow movement of his Linz Symphony.
The minuet is in G major. The trio has an unusual feature to it: after stating a rather simple theme, the fifths held in the bassoons and violas shift down a fourth in parallel, an effect typically avoided by the classical composers.
The finale is a sonata-rondo, with the rondo theme first presented in binary form. The first section of this is noteworthy for ending on unusual cadence on the mediant. A "perpetual-motion finale," it is considered one of the most cheerful Haydn ever wrote.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 92 G major Oxford , Bernstein Wiener Philarmoniker
 
1.Adagio, allegro spiritoso 0:40
2.Adagio cantabile 8:50
3.Menuetto 16:56
4.Presto 23:20
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 94 G major "Surprise" "Mit dem Paukenschlag" Bernstein Wiener Philarmoniker
 
The Symphony No. 94 in G major (Hoboken 1/94) is the second of the twelve so-called London symphonies (numbers 93-104) written by Joseph Haydn. It is usually called by its nickname, the Surprise Symphony, although in German it is more often referred to as the Symphony "mit dem Paukenschlag" ("with the kettledrum stroke").
Date of composition
Haydn wrote the symphony in 1791 in London for a concert series he gave during the first of his visits to England (1791--1792). The premiere took place at the Hanover Square Rooms in London on March 23, 1792, with Haydn leading the orchestra seated at a fortepiano.
Scoring
The Surprise Symphony is scored for a Classical-era orchestra consisting of two each of flutes, oboes, bassoons, horns, trumpets, plus timpani, and the usual string section consisting of first and second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.
Nickname (the Surprise)
Haydn's music contains many jokes, and the Surprise Symphony includes probably the most famous of all: a sudden fortissimo chord at the end of an otherwise piano opening theme in the variation-form second movement. The music then returns to its original quiet dynamic, as if nothing had happened, and the ensuing variations do not repeat the joke.
In Haydn's old age, George August Griesinger, his biographer, asked whether he wrote this "surprise" to awaken the audience. Haydn replied:
No, but I was interested in surprising the public with something new, and in making a brilliant debut, so that my student Pleyel, who was at that time engaged by an orchestra in London (in 1792) and whose concerts had opened a week before mine, should not outdo me. The first Allegro of my symphony had already met with countless Bravos, but the enthusiasm reached its highest peak at the Andante with the Drum Stroke. Encore! Encore! sounded in every throat, and Pleyel himself complimented me on my idea.
The work was popular at its premiere. The Woodfall's Register critic wrote: "The third piece of HAYDN was a new Overture [i.e. symphony], of very extraordinary merit. It was simple, profound, and sublime. The andante movement was particularly admired."
The Morning Herald critic wrote:
The Room was crowded last night.... A new composition from such a man as HAYDN is a great event in the history of music. — His novelty of last night was a grand Overture, the subject of which was remarkably simple, but extended to vast complication, exquisitly [sic] modulated and striking in effect. Critical applause was fervid and abundant."
Movements
Like all of Haydn's "London" symphonies, the work is in four movements, marked as follows:
• I. Adagio - Vivace assai 0:00
• II. Andante 9:34
• III. Menuetto: Allegro molto 16:10
• IV. Finale: Allegro molto 21:45
The first movement has a lyrical 3/4 introduction that precedes a highly rhythmic main section in 6/8 time. As with much of Haydn's work, it is written in so-called "monothematic" sonata form; that is, the movement to the dominant key in the exposition is not marked by a "second theme".
The second, "surprise", movement, the Andante, is a theme and variations in 2/4 time in the subdominant key of C major. The theme is in two eight-bar sections, each repeated. Haydn sets up the surprise, which occurs at the end of the repeat of the first section, by making the repeat pianissimo with pizzicato in the lower strings. Four variations of the theme follow, starting with embellishment in sixteenth notes by the first violins, moving to a stormy variation in C minor with trumpets and timpani, then solos for the first oboist and flautist, and concluding with a sweeping and lyrical forte repeat in triplets. In the coda section, the opening notes are stated once more, this time reharmonized with gently dissonant diminished seventh chords over a tonic pedal.
The third movement is a minuet and trio, in ternary form in the tonic key (G major). The tempo, Allegro molto, or very quickly, is of note since it marks the historical shift away from the old minuet (at a slower, i.e. danceable, tempo) toward the scherzo; by the time of his last quartets Haydn had started to mark his minuets presto.
The fourth movement is a characteristically rhythmic, energetic and propulsive Haydn finale. The movement is written in sonata rondo form with the opening bars appearing both at the beginning and in the middle of the development section. The stirring coda emphasizes the timpani.
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 96 D major The Miracle Roger Norrington SWR Stuttgart
 
The Symphony No. 96 in D major, Hoboken I/96, was completed by Joseph Haydn in 1791 as part of the set of symphonies composed on his first trip to London. It was first performed at the Hanover Square Rooms in London on 11 March 1791. Although it is the fourth of the so-called twelve London Symphonies (numbers 93-104) by number, it was actually the first one written and performed. It is popularly known as the Miracle Symphony.
Nickname (the Miracle)
It is so called due to the story that, during its premiere, a chandelier fell from the ceiling of the concert hall in which it was performed. The audience managed to dodge the chandelier successfully as they had all crowded to the front for the post-performance applause, and the symphony got its nickname. More careful and recent research suggests that this event did indeed take place but during the premiere of his Symphony No. 102.
Movements
The work is in standard four movement form and scored for two flutes, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings.
1. Adagio, 3/4 — Allegro, 3/4 0:00
2. Andante, 6/8 in G major 11:03
3. Menuetto: Allegretto, 3/4 16:29
4. Finale: Vivace, 2/4 21:35
The first movement is in sonata form. Following a slow introduction, the first theme of the exposition is actually two overlapping themes, a short-short-short-long repeated-note theme in the first violins over a falling motif in the middle strings and bassoons. Following a brief transitional section, the first theme returns giving the opening section a ternary structure. The first theme group closes with fanfares featuring repeated notes. What follows is a more extended transition featuring three repeated eighth-notes as in the opening of the Allegro. There is no true second theme group making this a P-T-K exposition. The expositional coda also features motifs containing three eighth notes. The development can be divided into three sections. The first section develops the exposition's first theme and the second develops themes from the expositional coda. Both of these sections touch on the relative minor, B minor. Following a two-measure grand pause, the third section opens with a false recapitulation of the exposition in the wrong key of G major which quickly collapses into more development of the first theme. When the recapitulation arrives, it proceeds quickly. Following another transition, the fanfares from the first theme group return building up to an unexpected stormy climax in D minor leaving just seven measures of D major to bring the movement to a close.
The slow movement in G major is in ternary form (ABA) featuring a lightly scored, lilting theme with three upbeats. The central "B" section of the movement is for full tutti in G minor and is highly contrapuntal. The second "A" section finishes suspended on a cadential six-four chord. The following coda is indeed an orchestral cadenza featuring solos from the two principal violinists (including Salomon) and solos from the principal winds as well.
The trio of the minuet features an extended oboe solo.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 97 C major Bernstein New York Philarmonic
 
The Symphony No. 97 in C major, Hoboken I/97, is the fifth of the so-called twelve London Symphonies (numbers 93-104) written by Joseph Haydn. It was completed in 1792 as part of the set of symphonies composed on his first trip to London. It was first performed at the Hanover Square Rooms in London on 3 or 4 May 1792. First published in England, it made its way to the continent a few years later and was used by Ludwig van Beethoven as a model for a symphony in C major he never completed, and by Friedrich Witt for the Jena Symphony.
Movements
The work is in standard four movement form and scored for two flutes, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings.
1. Adagio - Vivace, 3/4 0:18
2. Adagio ma non troppo, 2/2 in F major 9:10
3. Menuetto e Trio. Allegretto, 3/4 16:38
4. Finale: Presto assai, 2/4 21:12
After a slow introduction which deliberately avoids establishing C major, the main theme of the first movement is a fanfare that emphasizes the three notes of the C major triad.

The second subject is a landler that makes use of pizzicato in the bass.

The second movement is a set of F major variations with an irregular episode in F minor and a coda. In the variation following the minore episode, Haydn used the unusual sul ponticello marking instructing the violins to play with the bow near the bridge creating a "glassy" or "metallic" sound.
For the final eight bars of the Trio of the minuet, Haydn instructs the concertmaster ("Salomon Solo" in the score) to play an octave above the rest of the first violins.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 98 B flat major Bernstein New York Philarmonic
 
The Symphony No. 98 in B flat major, Hoboken 1/98, is the sixth of the so-called twelve London Symphonies (numbers 93-104) written by Joseph Haydn. It was completed in 1792 as part of the set of symphonies composed on his first trip to London. It was first performed at the Hanover Square Rooms in London on 2 March 1792.
Instrumentation
The work is scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, strings and keyboard (harpsichord or piano).
The symphony's scoring is singular among Haydn's later symphonies. It requires an obbligato part for harpsichord, which has a prominent eleven-bar solo passage near the end of the finale. Although the harpsichord was often used as a continuo or solo instrument, it was rarely given a prominence of this kind in purely orchestral works. Most likely, Haydn himself played the harpsichord at the premiere.
Movements
1. Adagio - Allegro, 2/2 0:19
2. Adagio, 3/4 10:40
3. Menuetto. Presto, 3/4 17:30
4. Finale. Presto, 6/8 23:35
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 100 G major Military Concertgebouw, Jansons
 
The Symphony No. 100 in G major, Hoboken I/100, is the eighth of the twelve so-called London Symphonies written by Joseph Haydn and completed in 1793 or 1794. It is popularly known as the Military Symphony.
Nickname (Military)
The nickname "Military" derives from the second movement, which features prominent fanfares written for C-trumpets and percussion effects. One reviewer wrote after the premiere that the second movement evoked the "hellish roar of war increas[ing] to a climax of horrid sublimity!"
Movements
The work is in standard four movement form and scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, triangle, cymbals, bass drum and strings. In several editions there is only one flute.
1. Adagio; Allegro, 2/2 0:00
2. Allegretto, 2/2 in C major 7:59
3. Menuetto: Moderato, 3/4 14:20
4. Presto, 6/8 19:18
The first movement is in sonata form with a slow introduction that hints at motifs that will appear later in the movement. The Allegro begins with a dancing theme which is unexpectedly scored only for flutes and oboes. The strings respond by repeating the theme an octave lower. The tutti then transitions the music to the dominant key for the second subject area, which begins with the first theme transposed to D major. This theme is briefly developed in D minor before a new subject in the dominant is stated with a rocking motif in the violins. Haydn's use of themes and keys here demonstrates an important point about sonata form: the second subject is defined by the new key , not (only) a new theme. The repetition of the 1st subject in the dominant in this movement, at bar 75, is therefore the beginning of the 2nd subject area, even though the new theme does not appear until some twenty bars later.
A tutti codetta brings the first movement exposition to a close. Following a repeat, the development begins with a grand pause of two measures, the rocking motif appears in the distant key of B-flat major and is developed upward through several keys. The first theme then returns in E major and is development in tandem with the rocking motif back towards the tonic for the recapitulation. In the recapitulation, the response to the dancing flute/oboe theme is by the full tutti instead of just the strings. The rocking motif returns several times and a full tutti brings the movement to a close without a coda.
The "Military" second movement is derived from a movement from an earlier Concerto for Lire Organizzata in G, Hob. VIIh/3, which Haydn had composed for Ferdinand IV, King of Naples. The movement is in ternary form with central section in the minor. The instrumentation is richer than the other movements of the symphony. It is the only movement that uses divided violas and clarinets, but most importantly is the use of "Turkish" instruments (triangle, cymbals and bass drum) which make their first appearance in the central minor section. The movement concludes with an extended coda featuring a bugle call for solo trumpet, a timpani roll, which was a revolutionary adaptation of the instrument, and a loud outburst in A flat major.
In contrast to Haydn's trend of speeding up his minuets, here he slows the pace back to Moderato providing a more old-fashioned aristocratic minuet.
The finale is in sonata rondo form. The primary theme became a popular tune in its time. In the center of the movement is a development-like section which contains a surprise timpani strike followed by a traversal of many distant keys. Near the end of the movement, the "Turkish" instruments return coloring the tutti sections for the rest of the way
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 101 D major 'The Clock' R Norrington
 
The Symphony No. 101 in D major (Hoboken 1/101) is the ninth of the twelve so-called London Symphonies written by Joseph Haydn. It is popularly known as The Clock because of the "ticking" rhythm throughout the second movement.
Composition, premiere, and reception
Haydn completed the symphony in 1793 or 1794. He wrote it for the second of his two visits to London (1791-2, 1794-5).
The work was premiered on 3 March 1794, in the Hanover Square Rooms, as part of a concert series featuring Haydn's work organized by his colleague and friend Johann Peter Salomon; a second performance took place a week later.
As was generally true for the London symphonies, the response of the audience was very enthusiastic. The Morning Chronicle reported:
As usual the most delicious part of the entertainment was a new grand Overture [that is, symphony] by HAYDN; the inexhaustible, the wonderful, the sublime HAYDN! The first two movements were encored; and the character that pervaded the whole composition was heartfelt joy. Ever new Overture he writes, we fear, till it is heard, he can only repeat himself; and we are every time mistaken.
The work has always been popular and continues to appear frequently on concert programs and in recordings.
The music
It is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings.
The work is in standard four-movement form, as follows:
1. Adagio - Presto 0:00
2. Andante 8:15
3. Menuetto: Allegretto 14:15
4. Vivace 21:25
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 102 B Flat Major G Sinopoli Philarmonia Orchestra
 
The Symphony No. 102 in B flat major, Hoboken I/102, is the tenth of the twelve so-called London Symphonies written by Joseph Haydn.
Background
It was completed in 1794. It is now believed by many scholars to be the symphony at the premiere of which a chandelier fell from the ceiling of the concert hall in which it was performed. Fortunately, the audience escaped unharmed, supposedly because they had rushed the stage. It was long believed that this "Miracle" event took place at the premiere of his Symphony No. 96.
Movements
The work is in standard four-movement form and scored for two flutes, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings.
1. Largo—Vivace 0:00
2. Adagio in F major 8:40
3. Menuetto. Allegro 15:32
4. Finale. Presto 22:40
The second movement is an orchestration of the second movement of the F-sharp minor piano trio, Hob. XV/26 also transcribed from F sharp major to F major. The repeats in the trio are written out in the symphony allowing for changes in the orchestration upon the second hearing. Also, the symphony features the cellos playing a rolling triplet accompaniment whereas in the trio, the cello simply doubles the bass.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 103 'Drumroll' E flat major Minkowski
 
The Symphony No. 103 in E-flat major, Hoboken 1/103, is the eleventh of the twelve so-called London Symphonies written by Joseph Haydn. This symphony is nicknamed "The Drumroll", after the long roll on the timpani with which it begins.
Composition and premiere
The symphony was the last but one of twelve that were composed for performance in England during Haydn's two journeys there (1791--1792, 1794--1795). Haydn's music was well known in England well before the composer traveled there, and members of the British musical public had long expressed the wish that Haydn would visit. The composer's reception in England was in fact very enthusiastic, and the English visits were one of the most fruitful and happy periods of the composer's life. Haydn composed the "Drumroll" Symphony while living in London during the winter of 1794--1795.
The "Drumroll" Symphony was premiered on March 2, 1795 as part of a concert series called the "Opera Concerts", at the King's Theatre. The orchestra was unusually large for the time, consisting of about 60 players. The task of directing the work was divided between the concertmaster Viotti and Haydn, who sat at a fortepiano. The premiere was evidently a success, and the Morning Chronicle's reviewer wrote:
Another new Overture [i.e., symphony], by the fertile and enchanting Haydn, was performed; which, as usual, had continual strokes of genius, both in air and harmony. The Introduction excited deepest attention, the Allegro charmed, the Andante was encored, the Minuets, especially the trio, were playful and sweet, and the last movement was equal, if not superior to the preceding."
The Sun wrote:
HAYDN's new Overture was much applauded. It is a fine mixture of grandeur and fancy ... the second movement was encored.
Haydn later performed the work in Vienna, and for this purpose made a small cut in the final movement, which is usually respected by conductors today.
Scoring
The work is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani, and strings.
Movements
The work is in standard four movement form.
I. Adagio - Allegro con spirito 0:00
After the opening drumroll, the bass instruments play a somber opening theme.
As commentators have pointed out, the first four notes of which match the "Dies Irae" chant, part of the Latin mass for the dead.
H. C. Robbins Landon has remarked that at the start the theme is ambiguous between duple and triple time, and between the keys of C minor and (what ultimately proves the case) E flat major.
The sprightly 6/8 movement that follows this introduction is in sonata form, with a monothematic exposition. In a number of places it restates the theme of the introduction, in much faster tempo. Haydn restates part of the opening introduction in the coda, a formal procedure previously adopted by Mozart in his String Quintet K. 593 (1790). Beethoven was to do the same in his "Pathétique" piano sonata, published two years after the Drumroll Symphony in 1797.
II. Andante più tosto allegretto 8:35
In double variation form, with alternatingly varied themes in C minor and C major plus coda. The double variations had been a favorite musical form of the composer for about 20 years; along with the Piano Trio H. XV:23 from the same year, this was the last set he wrote. The themes are said to have been developed by Haydn from Croatian folk songs he knew; for discussion, see Haydn and folk music. Some different features in this movement include a long violin solo, as well as the lack of clarinets.
III. Menuetto 17:18
The minuet is in the home key of E flat major. Charles Rosen, in The Classical Style, chose this minuet to illustrate the point that Classical-era minuets often have very strong first beats, in contrast to the more flowing rhythm of the Baroque minuet
IV. Finale: Allegro con spirito 22:10
Like the first movement, the finale begins with a quasi-ritual gesture - in this case, a horn call, which is followed by a pause, and later echoed throughout the movement. It is in fast tempo, has a monothematic exposition, and is in sonata rondo form.
Like the themes of the second movement, the opening melody is said to be taken from Croatian folk song, in this case a tune called "Divojčica potok gazi", ("A little girl treads on a brook").
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Symphony No 104 D major "London", Sergiu Celbidache Munich Philarmonic
 
The Symphony No. 104 in D major (Hoboken 1/104) is Joseph Haydn's final symphony. It is the last of the twelve so-called London Symphonies, and is known (somewhat arbitrarily, given the existence of eleven others) as the London Symphony.
The work was composed by Haydn while he was living in London in 1795, and premiered there at the King's Theatre on 4 May 1795, in a concert featuring Haydn's own compositions and directed by the composer. The premiere was a success; Haydn wrote in his diary "The whole company was thoroughly pleased and so was I. I made 4000 gulden on this evening: such a thing is possible only in England."
Scoring
The work is for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets in A, two bassoons, two horns in D and G, two trumpets in D, timpani and strings.
Movements
1. Adagio -- Allegro
2. Andante
3. Menuetto and Trio: Allegro
4. Finale: Spiritoso
First movement
The symphony opens with a slow and grand introduction in D minor, which leads to the first movement proper in D major. This is in sonata form and starts in cut time. The movement is monothematic: the second theme is simply the first theme transposed to A major. The exposition is in D Major, with the strings playing the first theme. The theme goes straight into A Major with the woodwinds to form a second theme. The exposition closes with a codetta and is followed by the development which begins in B minor, using the rhythmic pattern of the second half of the theme. The development ends with the full orchestra. In the recapitulation, the first theme is heard again in D Major. It uses imitative patterns of the woodwinds in the second theme. The piece closes with a coda, also in D major.
Second movement
This movement, in G major, opens with the main theme in the strings. After this, a brief episode highlighting A minor and D minor leads to a modified repeat of the main theme in both strings and bassoon. From here, a second section begins which modulates to various other keys, including G minor and B flat major, but continues to feature the melody of the main theme. After arriving on the dominant of G major, the music of the first section returns. The rest of the movement consists of a modification of the first section of music, with several changes in rhythm and more prominence to the winds, especially the flute.
Third movement
he third movement is a minuet and trio in D major. The minuet section consists of a ternary (ABA) form with an opening section emphasizing the tonic, while the second section visits the relative minor (B minor) and the dominant (A major). The trio is in B flat major, and uses the oboe and bassoon extensively. Like in the minuet, this trio's B section emphasizes the relative minor (in this case, G minor). The trio ends with a transition back to dominant of the main key in preparation for the return to the minuet.
Fourth movement
The exuberant finale, in fast tempo and in sonata form, opens in the mode of folk music using a drone bass and a theme often claimed to have originated as a Croatian folk song; for details see Haydn and folk music. The development section settles on the dominant of the main key, as is typical, but the recapitulation does not occur immediately. Instead, the development is extended with a section in F sharp minor, after which the recapitulation in D major follows immediately.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn The Seasons, René Jacobs
 
Der Frühling 0:00
Der Sommer 28:45
Der Herbst 1:02:27
Der Winter 1:33:57

Freiburger Barockorchester
Rene Jacobs Conductor

 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Die Schöpfung The Creation Leonard Bernstein
 
Joseph Haydn The Creation Die Schöpfung
Judith Blegen soprano, Thomas Moser tenor, Kurt Moll bass
Bavarian Radio Symphony orchestra conducted by Leonard Bernstein
Es werde Licht, und es ward Licht 10:59
Stimmit an die Saiten, ergreift die Leiter 32:36
Es sei'n Lichter an der Feste des Himmels 35:38
Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes 38:54
Der Herr ist groß in seiner Macht 1:00:33
Vollendet ist das große Werk 1:!6:01
Von deiner Güt', o Herr und Gott 1:32:42
Holde Gattin! Dir zu Seite 1:45:33
Singt dem Herren, alle Stimmen! 1:55:38
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn - Cello Concerto No. 1 (Mstislav Rostropovich)
 
Mstislav Rostropovich plays this work whith the Orquesta Sinfónica de Radiotelevisión Española (Spanish Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra). Madrid. Teatro Real. 22.11.1985
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn, Cello Concert Nr 2 D Dur Mstislaw Rostropowitsch, Academy of St Martin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn Piano Concerto HobXVIII 11 D major , Sviatoslav Richter
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn 6 piano concertos
 
Haydn 6 piano concertos
ilse von lapenheim,piano
bamberg symphony
cond,antal dorati
vox box 3 lp

1-concerto in d major
2-concerto in g major
3-concerto in f major
4-concerto in g major
5- concerto in d major
6-concerto in c major

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn - 4 piano sonatas - Ránki live
 
Piano sonata n°33 Hob.XVI:20
I. Moderato 0:00
II. Andante con moto 10:16
III. Finale. Allegro 17:19

Piano sonata n°58 Hob.XVI:48
I. Andante con espressione 23:45
II. Rondo. Presto 30:18

Piano sonata n°60 Hob.XVI:50
I. Allegro 34:16
II. Adagio 45:33
III. Allegro molto 50:39

Piano sonata n°62 Hob.XVI:52
I. Allegro 52:52
II. Adagio 1:00:52
III. Presto 1:07:11

Dezső Ránki, Budapest, 1.VI.2009

 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn Piano Trios Hob. XV/1, XV/5, XV/C1 and XV/37, Van Swieten Trio
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn Piano Trios Hob. XV/6, XV/7, XV/34, XV/35 and XV/f1, Van Swieten Trio
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn Piano Trios Hob. XV/12, XV/36, XV/38 and XV/11, Van Swieten Trio
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn Piano Trios Hob XV/13, XV/14, XV/2, XV/39, Van Swieten Trio
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn Piano trios Hob. XV/21, XV/22, XV/23, XV/31 Van Swieten Trio
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn Piano trios Hob. XV/27, XV/28, XV/29, XV/30, Van Swieten Trio
 
Van Swieten Trio

Patrick Cohen Fortepiano
Erich Foebatrh Violin
Christophe Coin Violoncello

 
 
 
 
 
 
Joseph Haydn Piano Trios Hob. XV/40, XV/41, XV/9, XV/8 and XV/10, Van Swieten Trio
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haydn: Stabat Mater by Ann Murray, Sheila Armstrong, Martin Hill, Huttenlocher
 
Stabat Mater
1. Stabat Mater dolorosa (Largo) (tenor/choir)
2. O quam tristis (Larghetto) alto 6:23
3. Quis est homo (Lento) choir
4. Quis non posset (Moderato) soprano
5. Pro peccatis suae gentis (Allegro ma non troppo) bass
6. V'idit suum (lento e maestroso) tenor
7. Eia Mater (Allegretto) choir
8. Sancta Mater (Larghetto) duo soprano/tenor 31:10
9. Fac me vere (Lagrimoso) alto 38:10
10. Virgo virginum praeclara (Andante) soloists & choir
11. Flammis orci ne succendar (Presto) bass
12. Fac me cruce (Moderato) tenor
13. Quando corpus (Largo assai) soprano, alto,choir 55:12 Paradise gloria (Alla breve) soprano & choir

Sheila Armstrong, soprano
Ann Murray, alto
Martin Hill, tenor
Philippe Huttenlocher, bass

Lausanne Vocal Ensamble
Chamber Orchestra of Lausanne
Conducted by Michel Corboz
09/1981

 
 
 
 
 
 
     
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