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Carmina Burana
 

"Carmina Burana," Ger. collection of Latin monastic songs (set to music by Carl Orff, 1937)

 

The Wheel of Fortune from Carmina Burana
  Carmina Burana ( /ˈkɑrmɨnə bʊˈrɑːnə/), Latin for "Songs from Beuern" (short for: Benediktbeuern), is the name given to a manuscript of 254 poems and dramatic texts mostly from the 11th or 12th century, although some are from the 13th century. The pieces are mostly bawdy, irreverent, and satirical; they were written principally in Medieval Latin; a few in Middle High German, and some with traces of Old French or Provençal. Some are macaronic, a mixture of Latin and German or French vernacular. They were written by students and clergy when the Latin idiom was the lingua franca across Italy and western Europe for travelling scholars, universities and theologians. Most of the poems and songs appear to be the work of Goliards, clergy (mostly students) who set up and satirized the Catholic Church. The collection preserves the works of a number of poets, including Peter of Blois, Walter of Châtillon and an anonymous poet, referred to as the Archpoet. The collection was found in 1803 in the Benedictine monastery of Benediktbeuern, Bavaria, and is now housed in the Bavarian State Library in Munich. Along with the Carmina Cantabrigiensia, the Carmina Burana is the most important collection of Goliard and vagabond songs. The manuscripts reflect an "international" European movement, with songs originating from Occitania, France, England, Scotland, Aragon, Castile and the Holy Roman Empire.

Twenty-four poems in Carmina Burana were set to music by Carl Orff in 1936; Orff's composition quickly became popular and a staple piece of the classical music repertoire. The opening and closing movement, "O Fortuna", has been used in numerous films.

 
 
Orff Carl
 
Carl Orff, (born July 10, 1895, Munich, Ger.—died March 29, 1982, Munich), German composer known particularly for his operas and dramatic works and for his innovations in music education.
  Orff studied at the Munich Academy of Music and with the German composer Heinrich Kaminski and later conducted in Munich, Mannheim, and Darmstadt. His Schulwerk, a manual describing his method of conducting, was first published in 1930. Orff edited some 17th-century operas and in 1937 produced his secular oratorio Carmina Burana. Intended to be staged with dance, it was based on a manuscript of medieval poems. This work led to others inspired by Greek theatre and by medieval mystery plays, notably Catulli carmina (1943; Songs of Catullus) and Trionfo di Afrodite (1953; The Triumph of Aphrodite), which form a trilogy with Carmina Burana. His other works include an Easter cantata, Comoedia de Christi Resurrectione (1956); a nativity play, Ludus de nato infante mirificus (1960); and a trilogy of “music dramas”—Antigonae (1949), Oedipus der Tyrann (1959), and Prometheus (1966). Orff’s system of music education for children, largely based on developing a sense of rhythm through group exercise and performance with percussion instruments, has been widely adopted. In 1924 in Munich he founded, with the German gymnast Dorothee Günther, the Günther School for gymnastics, dance, and music.
 
 

The Forest, from the Carmina Burana
  Carmina Burana, German Lieder Aus Beuern, 13th-century manuscript that contains songs (the Carmina Burana proper) and six religious plays. The contents of the manuscript are attributed to the goliards, wandering scholars and students in western Europe during the 10th to the 13th century who were known for their songs and poems in praise of revelry. The collection is also called the Benediktbeuern manuscript, because it was found (in 1803) at the Benedictine monastery in Benediktbeuern (from which burana is derived), Bavaria. The two parts of the manuscript, though written at the same time, have been separated. The songs, rhymed lyrics mainly in Latin with a few in German, vary in subject and style: there are drinking songs, serious and licentious love songs, religious poems, pastoral lyrics, and satires of church and government. Some of the poems were set to music by Carl Orff in his cantata Carmina Burana (1937). The plays, in Latin, include the only known two surviving complete texts of medieval Passion dramas. These are the Ludus breviter de Passione (“Play in Brief of the Passion”), a prologue to a Resurrection play, and a longer text, probably amplified from a play on St. Mary Magdalene’s life and the raising of Lazarus. The other plays are an Easter play; an unusually comprehensive Christmas play; an enlarged Peregrinus, which treats Christ’s first two appearances to the disciples; and Ludus de rege Aegypti (“Play of the King of Egypt”), formerly regarded as part of the Christmas play.
 
 
 
 
Carl Orff: Carmina Burana
 
 
 
 
 
Carl Orff's Carmina Burana is one of the most popular pieces of the classical music repertoire. Here the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra, the University Chorus and Alumni Chorus, and the Pacific Boychoir perform at the Mondavi Center at UC Davis. Series: "Mondavi Center Presents" [6/2007] [Arts and Music] [Show ID: 11787]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Carmina Burana. O Fortuna. Carl Orff - Andre Rieu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     
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