TIMELINE OF WORLD HISTORY
 

Loading
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
   
   
  Gothic Art

Architecture


1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 78910 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14

Sculpture and Stained Glass

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 78910 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 16

Painting
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CONTENTS
  BACK NEXT    
 
 
   
 
 
 
Gothic Art
 
 
 
 
SCULPTURE

Beauneveu Andre
Sluter
Nicola Pisano
Giovanni Pisano
Andrea Pisano
Antelami Benedetto
Arnolfo di Camio
Lorenzo Maitani
Giovanni di Balduccio
Agostino di Giovanni
Tino di Camaino
Jacobello and Pierpaolo dalle Masegne
Lorenzo Chiberti
Jacopo della Quercia
 
 
 
Italy
 

CHURCH FACADES.

Italian Gothic church facades generally do not rival those of the French cathedrals as focal points of architectural and sculptural endeavor. The French Gothic
portal, with its jamb statues and richly carved tympanum, never found favor in the south. Instead, we often find a survival of Romanesque traditions of architectural sculpture, such as statues in niches or small-scale reliefs overlaying the wall surfaces
.

At Orvieto Cathedral, Lorenzo Maitani (before 1270-1330) covered the wide pilasters between the portals with relief carvings of such lacelike delicacy that we become aware of them only if we see them at close range. The tortures of the damned from The Last judgment on the southernmost pilaster make an instructive comparison with similar scenes in Romanesque art. The hellish monsters are as vicious as ever, but the sinners now evoke compassion rather than sheer horror. Even here, we feel the spirit of human sympathy that distinguishes the Gothic from the Romanesque.

 

 


Lorenzo Maitani

Lorenzo Maitani, (born c. 1275, near Siena, republic of Siena [Italy]—died June 1330, Orvieto, Papal States [Italy]), Italian architect and sculptor primarily responsible for the construction and decoration of the facade of Orvieto Cathedral.

Maitani established his reputation in Siena and was called to supervise the construction at Orvieto in 1308 when the unprecedented height and span of the cathedral’s vaults and arches presented unforeseen difficulties. In 1310 he received the title capomaestro of the cathedral and became, in addition, overseer of bridges and civic buildings.

Maitani’s most important contribution was the design of the cathedral’s facade. Though his contributions to the facade as a sculptor are difficult to determine, it may be assumed that his sensibility dictated the overall scheme. Two of the panels attributed to Maitani, “Scenes from Genesis” and “The Last Judgment,” are delicate bas-reliefs unified by an ascending vine that suggests a French Gothic influence. Sculptures generally attributed to Maitani include the bronze “Eagle of St. John” and the “Angel of St. Matthew.”



Faзade of the Cathedral. 1310-30. Duomo, Orvieto
 


 


First Pillar: Stories from Genesis. 1310-30. Marble. Duomo, Orvieto


 

First Pillar: Stories from Genesis. Adam and Eve


 

First Pillar: Stories from Genesis. Creation of Eve


 

First Pillar: Stories from Genesis.


 

First Pillar: Stories from Genesis.

 
 

Second Pillar: The Messianic Phrophesies. 1310-30. Marble. Duomo, Orvieto
1310-30
Marble
Duomo, Orvieto
 

 

Third Pillar: Stories from the New Testament. 1310-30. Marble. Duomo, Orvieto
1310-30
Marble
Duomo, Orvieto


 

Fourth Pillar: The Last Judgment. 1310-30. Marble. Duomo, Orvieto
1310-30
Marble
Duomo, Orvieto



 

LORENZO MAITANI. The Last Judgment (detail), from the facade of Orvieto Cathedral, с 1320

 
 

The Angel: Symbol of St Matthew. c. 1329. Bronze. Duomo, Orvieto
The Eagle: Symbol of St John. c. 1329. Bronze. Duomo, Orvieto
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
CONTENTS
  BACK NEXT